Author Topic: AGEMA Thermovision THV470 camera complete teardown by Fraser  (Read 678 times)

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Online Fraser

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Re: AGEMA Thermovision THV470 camera complete teardown by Fraser
« Reply #25 on: October 05, 2020, 09:36:51 pm »
The fixed mirror assembly. One fixed mirror is still in the chassis so not shown.

The surface corrosion is clearly visible. These should have a highly reflective mirror polished surface !

It is surprising that there is no moisture control within this camera. No Silica Gel packs, nothing. Aluminium corrodes readily in a damp atmosphere.

Fraser
« Last Edit: October 05, 2020, 10:53:25 pm by Fraser »
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Online Fraser

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Re: AGEMA Thermovision THV470 camera complete teardown by Fraser
« Reply #26 on: October 05, 2020, 10:10:02 pm »
A selection of full resolution images of the cooled detector element for your delight and delectation  ;D
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Online Fraser

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Re: AGEMA Thermovision THV470 camera complete teardown by Fraser
« Reply #27 on: October 05, 2020, 10:20:14 pm »
The principle of the SPRITE detector element. This and the associated pictures may help to make sense of what we can see in the pictures I took of the SPRITE detector.

Taken from a scientific paper on the SPRITE detector....

In the SPRITE an element is fabricated that is around 10 times as long as it is wide. The MCT detector material is biased with a current source. This causes the mobile carriers generated by infrared radiation to drift towards the read-out zone. If the drift speed is matched to the speed at which the scene information is being scanned across the SPRITE element, then all the carriers associated with a particular part of the scene arrive in phase at the read-out region. This improves the signal to noise ratio and greatly simplifies the use of the detector.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2020, 10:37:59 pm by Fraser »
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Offline Ultrapurple

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Re: AGEMA Thermovision THV470 camera complete teardown by Fraser
« Reply #28 on: October 06, 2020, 08:43:32 am »
Wow Fraser - that's a shed-load of photos and I have no doubt they will be used as the 'standard reference' in the future.

I'm always amazed just how methodically you work and how rigorously you document everything as you go. I'm aware that most of the time it's just for your own reference (did the brown wire go here or there?) but I know from my own experience that even getting good quality snapshots is no mean feat.

Thank you for sharing this with the world.
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Online Fraser

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Re: AGEMA Thermovision THV470 camera complete teardown by Fraser
« Reply #29 on: October 06, 2020, 09:11:41 am »
It was pretty much a dump of my picture archive and not what I normally like to do with pictures carefully selected for content. There is a lot of duplication so I will go through this threads pictures in slow time and delete the duplications. I provided some duplications, like the sensor as I did not have time to check which was the better focussed or lit. “Cat” wanted to see what the inside of the scanner looked like so I quickly uploaded what I thought might be useful :) I just hope the thread is of use and interest to someone.

Fraser
« Last Edit: October 06, 2020, 10:12:46 am by Fraser »
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Online Fraser

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Re: AGEMA Thermovision THV470 camera complete teardown by Fraser
« Reply #30 on: October 06, 2020, 10:20:31 am »
As Ultrapurple has stated, I carefully record the disassembly of equipment I work on. Relying upon memory can be risky when it comes to complex equipment. Knowing the original path that flexible cables took can be invaluable and avoids potential pinching of said cables during reasssembly. Service manuals for thermal cameras, even those from the 1980’s are not generally available (with the odd exception). As such it is a good idea to document working on a particular camera for future reference and to aid re-assembly  :-+ I extreme cases, it can be worthwhile to video a complex disassembly operation so that the recording may be played in reverse to reassemble the parts exactly as they came from the factory. I do not usually need such video recordings though. My brain seems to be ‘wired’ for methodical disassembly and re-assembly.

Fraser
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