Author Topic: Direct view thermal tube?  (Read 418 times)

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Offline Ultrapurple

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Direct view thermal tube?
« on: June 25, 2020, 09:30:26 am »
I came across this abstract:

Quote
Describes the pyroelectric electron mirror tube, which is a thermal imaging tube working in the 8-14 mu m band of the infrared. The principle of operation is that an image of the thermal scene is formed on a pyroelectric target and a representation of the resulting voltage pattern is formed on a phosphor screen using the principle of the electron mirror. This results in a direct-view tube requiring no mechanical scanning, cryogenic cooling, or TV circuitry.

(Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics : A direct-view thermal imaging tube : H A H Boot, J G Castledine, P G R King, K E Trezise and B Turner : Published 1 April 1976)

Leaving aside for a moment the unfortunate publication date, the abstract implies to me a tube not unlike a Gen 0 night vision device but with a pyroelectric photocathode. Google found an intriguing image:



Does anyone know any more about this, or possibly even have access to the original 1976 article?


« Last Edit: June 25, 2020, 10:20:55 am by Ultrapurple »
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Online Fraser

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Re: Direct view thermal tube?
« Reply #1 on: June 25, 2020, 12:55:32 pm »
I have that article  :)

I will send it to you later today

Fraser
 

Offline Bill W

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Re: Direct view thermal tube?
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2020, 12:56:35 pm »
Somewhat before my time, but it was an attempt as you say at a thermal image intensifier.  It did not work very well, and the disadvantages of the bulky discrete electronics for the vidicon camera approach rapidly reduced.
This is what 'reduced' meant though...


A similar concept was promoted by 'RedShift' much more recently where again a thermal sensitive array affected a visual system, in the RedShift case a CCD camera.  They called it a TLV - Thermal Light Valve
https://www.techbriefs.com/component/content/article/tb/techbriefs/photonics/12142
RedShift also did not make it iff the bench, may even have been a scam, but kept a few folks off the streets for a few years.

Offline Ultrapurple

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Re: Direct view thermal tube?
« Reply #3 on: June 25, 2020, 01:10:19 pm »
Is that white tank the liquid nitrogen reserve?  :-DD

(Yes I know it was an uncooled camera, but even so...)
« Last Edit: June 25, 2020, 01:22:10 pm by Ultrapurple »
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Offline Ultrapurple

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Re: Direct view thermal tube?
« Reply #4 on: June 25, 2020, 01:26:35 pm »
« Last Edit: June 25, 2020, 02:13:25 pm by Ultrapurple »
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Online Fraser

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Re: Direct view thermal tube?
« Reply #5 on: June 25, 2020, 02:51:12 pm »
As Ultrapurple has said to me offline, I am surprised that a wavelength converter for thermal wavelengths did not progress further in Military circles. I say this because the infrared wavelength converters and image intensifiers did undergo great development for military applications and grew more capable as a result. A pyroelectric thermal wavelength converter that was like the modern military image intensifier units with high gain figures would have been an interesting development. Resolution would be dictated by target and phosphor grain and any micro channel amplification stages, if used. Imagine making a high resolution converter that you could bolt onto a high resolution modern SLR camera ! Such exists for image intensification and IR. An example being the Electrophysics Astroscope of which I own a Gen 3 example  8)

Fraser
« Last Edit: June 25, 2020, 03:03:36 pm by Fraser »
 

Offline Flukav

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Re: Direct view thermal tube?
« Reply #6 on: June 25, 2020, 04:06:23 pm »
Reminds me of this great scope-looking passive thermal imager:
https://benkrasnow.blogspot.com/2010/10/low-cost-diy-thermal-imaging-liquid.html
 


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