Poll

Has the hackabiliy of the E4 made you buy one :  

Yes, I was already looking at the competition at a similar price, but the hack swung it to E4
238 (26.3%)
Yes, I'd not considered buying a TIC before, but 320x240 resolution at this price justifies it (as either tool or toy!)
425 (47%)
Yes, I was going to buy an E5/6/8 class of unit but will now get the E4
43 (4.8%)
No, but am looking out for a cheap i3 to hack
41 (4.5%)
Not yet, but probably will if now that a closed-box hack becomes is possible
158 (17.5%)

Total Members Voted: 780

Author Topic: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown  (Read 2634080 times)

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Offline nersut

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2350 on: December 15, 2013, 05:18:09 am »
Hi everyone

Does anyone trying to get all the 320x240 resolution from the Flir i3/i5/i7???  :-//

I have successfully upgraded my i3 to 144x144 (actually 120x120 in Flir tools) & added the extra measurement menu.

I really hope that someone could find a fix/hack to use all the potential resolution.

I tried simply replace the numbers in the conf.cfg file from 144 to 320 & 240 but it is still stuck on 120x120.
 

Offline Taucher

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2351 on: December 15, 2013, 07:50:52 am »
Hi everyone
Does anyone trying to get all the 320x240 resolution from the Flir i3/i5/i7???  :-//
...
I tried simply replace the numbers in the conf.cfg file from 144 to 320 & 240 but it is still stuck on 120x120.
Well, every hardware has REAL limits ... guess where they are for your i-series  :palm:

Online mikeselectricstuff

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2352 on: December 15, 2013, 09:34:05 am »
Hi everyone
Does anyone trying to get all the 320x240 resolution from the Flir i3/i5/i7???  :-//
...
I tried simply replace the numbers in the conf.cfg file from 144 to 320 & 240 but it is still stuck on 120x120.
Well, every hardware has REAL limits ... guess where they are for your i-series  :palm:
Even if display resolution is limited, it could potentially save full-res images, but ISTR someone here found evidence that the FPGA code limits resolution.
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Online Fraser

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2353 on: December 15, 2013, 09:48:02 am »
And of course there is the issue of the Mk1 and Mk2 FLIR 'i' series cameras. IIRC the Mk1 i7 had lower resolution of 120x120 maximum rather than the later Mk2 with 140x140.
 

Offline G0HZU

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2354 on: December 15, 2013, 01:15:32 pm »
Quote
The lens cover was on and off... didn't seem to make a difference, and these problems seldom occurred and didn't seem to happen with a particular combination of lens cover/power button press, just when the AC adapter was plugged in.
It seems like when running on batteries, these problems do not occur.
This also occurred even before ANY "updating" was done (stock E4), so it doesn't appear to be due to the mod.

Yes, I think mine also went a bit mad because I used it with the USB charger connected. I assumed I'd been clumsy in fitting it or removing it during the charging process and this kicked off the instability. The USB interface/connector system is laughably poor on the camera and I'm amazed how it got through a basic design review at Flir.

My camera has only the basic mod done. I haven't bothered with the menu mods yet. But when it went mad I saw various regular patterns on the screen and the scaling did something similar to your image with it showing temperature extremes in the scaling.

By doing the battery remove/reset trick it seems to have fully cleared the problem.
 

Offline nersut

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2355 on: December 15, 2013, 01:21:49 pm »
And of course there is the issue of the Mk1 and Mk2 FLIR 'i' series cameras. IIRC the Mk1 i7 had lower resolution of 120x120 maximum rather than the later Mk2 with 140x140.

Yes, there is a file in /flashFS/system called "fpga_isc0601_120x120_c16.bin" which seems to be the limiting the resolution.
There is also a file called "fpga.castor.bin" in the same folder.

I have uploaded the files in ZIP-format if anyone is interested in looking at the code in the file.
 

Offline Anders Olsson

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2356 on: December 15, 2013, 02:54:16 pm »
I had a look what differs my E4 1.0 from my friends E4 1.1:

..............................................

Model E4 1.0
Serial number 639035XX
Part number 63901-010
Software 1.87.7

Calibration date: September 30

IRDM 0.0.1.0
POLLUX 0.1.0.0
POLLUX_FPGA 8.1.18.0
camcore T198304 - 01 - 63804XXX
detector * _ * _ *
mainboard T198283 - 10 - 1996XXXX
appkit 1.0.13
confkit E4 1.0
osimgkit 16.0.10
prodkit 1.0.0.7
AppCore 22.0.0.3
AppServices 22.0.0.1
Bootloader 16.0.3.0
ResMon 22.0.0.1
WinCE 6.0.0.0
appcore_dll 1.9.0.1
common_dll 1.9.0.1
facet_core 22.0.0.1
facet_ui_qml 22.0.0.1
fvd 16.0.46.0

...........................................

Model E4 1.1
Serial number 639084XX
Part number 63901-010
Software 1.91.8

Calibration date: November 28

IRDM 0.0.1.0
POLLUX 0.1.0.0
POLLUX_FPGA 8.1.25.0
camcore T198304 - 01 - 63804XXX
detector * _ * _ *
mainboard T198283 - 10 - 1996XXXX
appkit 1.0.14
confkit E4 1.1
osimgkit 16.0.10
prodkit 1.0.0.8
AppCore 22.0.0.5
AppServices 22.0.0.1
Bootloader 16.0.3.0
ResMon 22.0.0.1
WinCE 6.0.0.0
appcore_dll 1.9.0.1
common_dll 1.9.0.1
facet_core 22.0.0.1
facet_ui_qml 22.0.0.1
fvd 16.0.47.0

.......................................

Both are marked Model: FLIR E63900, T198547
As far as I can see they are identical on the outside.
The plastic box and the accessories appears to be identical too.

EDIT: Added calibration dates.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2013, 04:29:51 pm by Anders Olsson »
 

Online Fraser

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2357 on: December 15, 2013, 03:57:17 pm »
The E4 1.1 release is dated 25 October 2013. My first thoughts were a counter-measured version created as a response to Mike's revelations earlier in that month. That would have been a very short development and testing period though and the user improvements are still possible. Closing some potentially exploitable, as yet undiscovered, vulnerabilities in the code is another possibility. If that were the case, I would have expected closure of the 'Mike upgrade' route as well.

I am aware that the critical issue for FLIR is to prevent any chance of upgrades to higher frame rates though. In the big scheme of things, the resolution increase is not such a big issue. Complying with ITAR is. I make no suggestions as to what the changes in E4 V1.1 achieve but it will be interesting to discover their purpose in the longer term.

I am pleased with the stability and performance of the E4 V1.0 so it is hard to guess what needed improvement.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2013, 04:01:20 pm by Aurora »
 

Offline nacke

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2358 on: December 15, 2013, 06:00:49 pm »
E4's micro-usb connector reminds me of Nokia N900, which had badly supported and fragile usb slot.

http://www.blogcdn.com/www.engadget.com/media/2010/02/nokia-n900-microusb.jpg

It might be a good idea to grind down the teeth on male connector to avoid that to happen.
 

Offline olsenn

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2359 on: December 15, 2013, 06:16:52 pm »
I have two questions about things I've been reading on here:

1) How fragile is the micro-usb connector? I've never had one of those break on me before but everyone here keeps complaining about how it worries them needing to rely on that for charging.

2) Regarding the frame rate and ITAR, would FLIR be liable for us hacking their product (in the theoretical event that we do), so would only WE be breaking the law by doing so? I mean if FLIR sells the things in compliance of ITAR regulations and we modify the device to no longer comply with said regulations, how is this FLIR's fault?
 

Online Fraser

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2360 on: December 15, 2013, 06:35:10 pm »
Olsenn,

Good questions....answers here:

1. The Micro USB connector is a low torque resistant design that does not incorporate mechanical strain relief. It relies upon the small solder pads on each side of the shell. Mike noted this weakness in the design in his video. You need to consider the fact that the E4 is a large and heavy object when compared to your average mobile phone that commonly uses tiny connectors. There appears little reason to fit such a tiny and potentially fragile connector in the E4. I also find the micro USB connector a PITA when needing to plug the data com or charger cable into it. Fiddly instead of easy IMHO. Hopefully we will find it to be reliable and robust enough in service. Who wants to send their E4 back to a service agent because of a damned USB connector failure....I certainly would not wish to  ;)

2. The regulations surrounding the manufacture of thermal cameras are complex. You are absolutely right that it is the customer making the changes without manufacturer aid or approval. Sadly that does not mean that if a frame rate hack were to become public, FLIR need take no action. Due to the products nature they have to make all reasonable efforts to prevent such. If a hack becomes available, they have to make reasonable efforts to prevent its on-going effectiveness on new stock. Failure to do so can effect the approvals in place for world wide distribution of such technology.  I have been advised of this difficult situation that FLIR are facing from an industry insider, and have no reason to doubt the source.

Interestingly, it is not illegal or prohibited to modify the E4. No action would be enforceable against a user carrying out such a modification on his/her camera. If you decided to sell a 320*240  >9Hz camera to a military enemy of the Western World, that would be a different matter however. 
« Last Edit: December 15, 2013, 06:42:05 pm by Aurora »
 

Offline nacke

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2361 on: December 15, 2013, 06:47:29 pm »
Maybe someone could design separate battery charger just like those 3D -printed lens adjust tools. Just some copper wiring in it and there it goes :D
 

Online Fraser

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2362 on: December 15, 2013, 06:57:29 pm »
The charger needs to contain the appropriate charge management circuit for the Li-Ion E4 battery or else overcharging may be a risk. I personally have too little experience of Li-Ion chargers to risk it.

I considered buying one of the significantly cheaper 'Intelligent'  Li-Ion chargers designed for Radio Control type batteries, but as I know nothing of the E4 battery internal design, I would have had to go with a straight + and - charge input with no internal temperature monitoring. I know it can be done, but is such wise. I really don't know  :-//

I do have a FLIR external charger and spare battery en-route to me though. I will see how complex the charger is when it arrives and advise accordingly.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2013, 07:03:42 pm by Aurora »
 

Online mikeselectricstuff

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2363 on: December 15, 2013, 07:10:37 pm »
I have two questions about things I've been reading on here:

1) How fragile is the micro-usb connector? I've never had one of those break on me before but everyone here keeps complaining about how it worries them needing to rely on that for charging.
Although The micro-USB is similar to that used on other products, an issue on the E4 is that the angle of the PCB makes the plug entry at a slightly non-intuitive angle, so a clumsy insertion by a user unfamiliar with it is more likely to cause damage than on, say, a phone.  Definitely warn anyone you might loan it to!
Quote
2) Regarding the frame rate and ITAR, would FLIR be liable for us hacking their product (in the theoretical event that we do), so would only WE be breaking the law by doing so? I mean if FLIR sells the things in compliance of ITAR regulations and we modify the device to no longer comply with said regulations, how is this FLIR's fault?
ITAR (and related regs in other countries) does cover release of information, but it's not clear if this only applies to the original manufacturer (Hence Flir won;t give out any tech service info) , or also to anyone elsepublishing information allowing conversion to an export-controlled specification.
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Online Fraser

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2364 on: December 15, 2013, 07:20:59 pm »
With regard to a DIY external charger for the Ex series.

As I stated, I considered building my own using an intelligent charger in order to remain safe from the unfortunate effects of a Li-Ion battery that is maltreated whilst charging ... I really don't need to experience a battery explosion or fire in the house....my wife would banish me to the lab !

I was going to use one of the many Ansmann X-Base Deluxe chargers (240V/12V supply) that I have, as they can charge many battery technologies, including Li-Ion, using just two terminals. Batteries charged in this way are not monitored by the charger though. I also managed to purchase several fire containment pouches from the local Model shop that was shutting down. GBP2.99 looked a good deal  :) These pouches are to be recommended to those experimenting with Li-Ion charging. They apparently contain the explosion and sacrifice themselves to stop any fire escaping. Cheap insurance ?

I was going to pursue this avenue of investigation as the FLIR charger costs an eye watering $125 and likely GBP125 in the UK  OUCH !

I have since been gifted the FLIR charger and a spare battery, so the investigation into an alternative charger ceased.

http://traxxas.com/support/Traxxas-Battery-Basics

A Lithium battery pouch safety test:

« Last Edit: December 15, 2013, 08:13:30 pm by Aurora »
 

Offline nacke

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2365 on: December 15, 2013, 08:03:45 pm »
The charger needs to contain the appropriate charge management circuit for the Li-Ion E4 battery or else overcharging may be a risk. I personally have too little experience of Li-Ion chargers to risk it.

Looking at the dimensions of the battery, I think there probably is a normal 18650 LiCO cell in it. The protection circuit could be in the cell it self, or does 3 connectors instead of 2 tell that there is no circuit?

Flir could use these panasonics and increase capacity by nearly 30 %:

http://www.fasttech.com/product/1141104-panasonic-ncr18650b-protected-rechargeable
« Last Edit: December 15, 2013, 08:10:55 pm by nacke »
 

Online mikeselectricstuff

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2366 on: December 15, 2013, 08:19:23 pm »
The charger needs to contain the appropriate charge management circuit for the Li-Ion E4 battery or else overcharging may be a risk. I personally have too little experience of Li-Ion chargers to risk it.

Looking at the dimensions of the battery, I think there probably is a normal 18650 LiCO cell in it. The protection circuit could be in the cell it self, or does 3 connectors instead of 2 tell that there is no circuit?

Flir could use these panasonics and increase capacity by nearly 30 %:

http://www.fasttech.com/product/1141104-panasonic-ncr18650b-protected-rechargeable
From measuring at the contacts, I'm pretty sure the third contact is just a standard 10K thermistor, not a data line. There is probably a standard protection circuit in there, so should be chargeable from a normal 18650 charger.
There is a gas-gauge IC on the main board - not sure how this handles battery swapping though. As you can get a charge percentage by pressing the left& right buttons in charge mode, you could probably work out the logic.
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Offline daves

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2367 on: December 15, 2013, 08:41:38 pm »
Regarding the frame rate and ITAR, would FLIR be liable for us hacking their product (in the theoretical event that we do), so would only WE be breaking the law by doing so? I mean if FLIR sells the things in compliance of ITAR regulations and we modify the device to no longer comply with said regulations, how is this FLIR's fault?

I do not understand why framerate is such issue. There are many cameras doing 30fps you can buy. As I posted here before, I am selling my old ARGUS, due to new FLIR E4. And see the framerate and the resolution. So. If anybody wants, its possible to buy many 30fps cameras and legally.

I also do not understand why export from USA to EU is restricted, when Flir is made in EU :scared: and is coming from EU. You can buy it normally in EU, so why export from USA is forbiden ?  :palm:

Batch Thermal Images Editor (JPG, BMT, SNP, IRI, ISI, IS2, PGM, TIF, IMG, BMP):  https://www.eevblog.com/forum/testgear/flir-e4-thermal-imaging-camera-teardown/msg350556/#msg350556
 

Online Fraser

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2368 on: December 15, 2013, 08:56:10 pm »
There is an interesting thread on adapting chargers to charge 18650 cells on this forum:

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/beginners/canon-camera-li-on-charger-to-charge-18650-batteries/

As Mike suggested, the third terminal is commonly just a 10K thermistor. You can modify a quality camera battery charger and keep the temperature monitoring safety features  :)

 

Offline nersut

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2369 on: December 15, 2013, 09:07:57 pm »
Hi everyone

I created a step-by-step guide with pictures how to permanently upgrade i3 & i5 to i7 specs & how to add the extra measurements menu.

Link: http://www.filedropper.com/howtoupgradeyourfliri3ori5toi7specsextramenu Link updated 16-03-2015

Cheers
Erik
« Last Edit: March 16, 2015, 10:52:58 pm by nersut »
 

Online Fraser

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2370 on: December 15, 2013, 09:25:02 pm »
@daves,

This matter has come up for discussion previously but I think all my input was deleted by me during my major self-deletion event.

Thermal camera technology has been controlled due to its military applications. It is a VERY effective tool to help kill people (believe me, I know). It can be very hard to hide your thermal 'footprint' in theatre and the military realised this.

Thermal camera technology was the preserve of the military, fire fighting services and industry. It was both extremely expensive technology and heavily controlled to prevent our enemies obtaining it and using it against our forces. Over time the technology has developed and become both more compact and available to the public. In order to allow public use the cameras used to be provided direct from the manufacturer to the customer after background security checks had been completed and a licence issued.

In more recent years the US Government decided that thermal cameras should be available to a wider marketplace but with Caveats. The caveats were that medium resolution, high frame rate cameras could only be sold to persons who had been subject to background checks and who were not considered a threat to NATO. What was permitted was the supply of medium resolution low frame rate thermal cameras to the public without background checks. Export controls still apply to such devices in terms of selling or supplying them to enemies of NATO.

The agreement on the international transportation and supply of devices that may forma part of a weapons system is INTERNATIONAL and part of the Wassenaar Arrangement. Europe complies with the contents of this agreement (Including Estonia !)

http://www.wassenaar.org/

http://www.wassenaar.org/controllists/index.html      Section 6 applies (6.3 onwards)

Note that required performance limiters are not supposed to be non-removable in order to comply with the arrangement ! This would suggest that FLIR would have to hard code certain specs into the chipset as already suspected by Mike and others.

There has been discussion on why a 9fps camera is OK yet a 30fps or 60fps is not. I regret I cannot comment on this but needless to say it relates to weapon system capability. I am fully aware that it is possible to illegally or covertly obtain thermal camera technology. That is not a reason to make the higher capability technology freely available to all however. Why make like easy for your enemies ?

There was a recent auction in the UK for a 1280 x 1024 60fps weapons grade thermal camera. It was being sold by an official MoD disposal contractor and a mistake had been made. I advised the contractor of the status of the thermal camera as a prohibited item for public sale and it was immediately withdrawn. I am still amazed at the hostility vented on me for taking this action. Some people do not get the bigger picture and do not realise that some of us are duty bound to take action.

I think it only fair to advise that I am not impartial on the matter of making >9fps thermal cameras easily available to all. If you are in the security & weapons systems industry you understand the implications. If you are not in the security and weapons industry, it can be hard to accept but I am afraid that is just life.

There may be a case for relaxing the thermal camera restrictions but as many will know, changes in national security and military policy takes time and needs an adequate incentive, Such does not exist at this time.

In time the Chinese will develop better thermal camera cores....but remember China is NOT an enemy of NATO  ;)

With regard to your ARGUS..... I know the cameras well  ;)

The ARGUS 1 is the first Generation ARGUS fire fighting camera, recognisable by its yellow case and round image. It is a pyro-electric vidicon based camera with relatively low line count (around 200 lines) and low sensitivity, meaning low range. It was perfect for the fire fighter however and easily sees through smoke. The ARGUS 1 is low performance compared to later technologies and is not ITAR liable. Technical information on these early Pyro-Vidicon based units is releasable to the public under an NDA.

The ARGUS 2 introduced the first BST FPA detector into the range. It is normally to be found in a black case with a standard 4:3 aspect ratio display. It uses a Raytheon BST thermal engine and IS a Raytheon NDA controlled device. The thermal engine is 320x240 30fps high performance unit. It is a very capable tool and performed well in the fire fighting services.  No technical details of the unit may be released to the public.

The ARGUS 3 is available in two versions....Blue case and Yellow case. They both use 320x240 30fps thermal engines. The yellow cased version uses a Raytheon thermal engine and IS an ITAR controlled device. I do not have details of the Blue cased units thermal engine. No technical details of the unit may be released to the public.

The ARGUS series continues to this day and now uses Micro-bolometers. They remain a controlled product due to their capabilities. No technical details of the unit may be released to the public.

I am aware that these cameras appear on auction sites....that is where I bought some of mine. Strictly speaking the sale of the units is not permitted but the sellers do not realise this. If you own one, it is not an illegal item to have. You just need to be aware that if you sell it, especially to an enemy of NATO, you could get into hot water with your own governments 'agencies'.

In truth, old ex fire brigade BST cameras are of little interest to the authorities these days. More modern Micro-bolometer high resolution, high frame rate thrmal cameras ARE of interest to them.

Also note that the ARGUS 3 is still supported by E2V. Faulty units often have dead thermal engines that make them uneconomic to repair. Be careful if buying one that is not shown working.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2014, 03:50:23 pm by Aurora »
 

Offline nacke

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2371 on: December 15, 2013, 09:36:33 pm »
There is a gas-gauge IC on the main board - not sure how this handles battery swapping though. As you can get a charge percentage by pressing the left& right buttons in charge mode, you could probably work out the logic.

It could be just calculating percentage from cell voltage, if chemistry stays the same there is no problem.

As Mike suggested, the third terminal is commonly just a 10K thermistor. You can modify a quality camera battery charger and keep the temperature monitoring safety features  :)

That would be smart way for sure, especially if one wishes to use higher charging currents.

I created a step-by-step guide with pictures how to permanently upgrade i3 & i5 to i7 specs & how to add the extra measurements menu.

That's very professional looking guide there. How much resolution you were able to get from i3/i5?
 

Online mikeselectricstuff

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2372 on: December 15, 2013, 09:44:12 pm »
Hi everyone

I created a step-by-step guide with pictures how to permanently upgrade i3 & i5 to i7 specs & how to add the extra measurements menu.

Link: http://www.filedropper.com/howtoupgradeyourfliri3ori5toi7specsextramenu_1

Cheers
Erik
Thanks - I'll add a link to this post from the start of the thread - if you update it, update this message so the link will stay valid.
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Offline pomonabill221

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2373 on: December 15, 2013, 09:45:08 pm »
The charger needs to contain the appropriate charge management circuit for the Li-Ion E4 battery or else overcharging may be a risk. I personally have too little experience of Li-Ion chargers to risk it.

Looking at the dimensions of the battery, I think there probably is a normal 18650 LiCO cell in it. The protection circuit could be in the cell it self, or does 3 connectors instead of 2 tell that there is no circuit?

Flir could use these panasonics and increase capacity by nearly 30 %:

http://www.fasttech.com/product/1141104-panasonic-ncr18650b-protected-rechargeable
From measuring at the contacts, I'm pretty sure the third contact is just a standard 10K thermistor, not a data line. There is probably a standard protection circuit in there, so should be chargeable from a normal 18650 charger.
There is a gas-gauge IC on the main board - not sure how this handles battery swapping though. As you can get a charge percentage by pressing the left& right buttons in charge mode, you could probably work out the logic.
I believe Li-Ion batteries need current limiting to about 400ma, then when the terminal voltage reaches 4.2-4.25 volts, constant voltage charging starts.
This is for a 18650 3.2v battery.

I don't THINK temperature is used for charge termination (like Ni-cad or Ni-Mh are), but may be there to terminate charge IF the temperature increases.

Normal Li-Ion batteries do not get warm when charging (providing they are good and not defective), but you can damage them if you charge them with high current or overvoltage.

Voltage is critical!  Also, you do NOT want to undervolt them as that will permanently damage them.

There is alot of info on Li-Ion batteries and charging on the net.

Like was said before, it more than likely is a Li-Ion battery and an 18650. (see picture for comparison) The green battery is a panasonic 3400 mAh.  The Flir's battery is a 2800 mAh so I just might crack the battery open and see what's inside!
Sorry this is getting off topic, but I wanted to share my info on this.
 

Online mikeselectricstuff

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Re: Flir E4 Thermal imaging camera teardown
« Reply #2374 on: December 15, 2013, 09:46:58 pm »
I don't THINK temperature is used for charge termination (like Ni-cad or Ni-Mh are), but may be there to terminate charge IF the temperature increases.
AIUI the thermistor is used both for overtemp cutout, and also to prevent starting charging at low temps, which I believe can cause problems like being on fire.
Youtube channel:Taking wierd stuff apart. Very apart.
Mike's Electric Stuff: High voltage, vintage electronics etc.
Day Job: Mostly LEDs
 


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