Author Topic: OpenIRV. ISC0901B0 (Autoliv NV3, FLIR E4/5/6/8) based opensource thermal camera  (Read 11668 times)

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Offline LesioQ

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NV3 lens' clear aperture is 15mm. Objective is of a two-lens design.
Lots of cost-saving on NV3, including Ge protective window thickness being 1/2 NV2.
 

Offline tisher

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so 'only' need to find focal length for first lens  :-+
 

Offline mikeselectricstuff

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I would be _really_ curious about firmware dumps of these devices, or any specification that go beyond the two-page summaries.
A few years ago, after I did a teardown video on one of these, someone emailed me, with some info they'd reverse-engineered, but didn't want to publish due to ITAR concerns.
The main point was that they had found that the original FPGA used a Microblaze core, and it was easy to find the code image in the flash memory, and after disassembling with IDA, they managed to reverse-engineer the handshake protocol used to authenticate the camera with the control box.
There might be some useful insights in to how any sensor-unique data is stored.
 
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Offline Ismsanmar

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I would be _really_ curious about firmware dumps of these devices, or any specification that go beyond the two-page summaries.
A few years ago, after I did a teardown video on one of these, someone emailed me, with some info they'd reverse-engineered, but didn't want to publish due to ITAR concerns.
The main point was that they had found that the original FPGA used a Microblaze core, and it was easy to find the code image in the flash memory, and after disassembling with IDA, they managed to reverse-engineer the handshake protocol used to authenticate the camera with the control box.
There might be some useful insights in to how any sensor-unique data is stored.

Are you talking about this?:
https://www.eevblog.com/forum/thermal-imaging/autoliv-nv2-on-raspberry-pi/
 

Offline LesioQ

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so 'only' need to find focal length for first lens  :-+
What's the purpose of it's focal length ? For f-stop calculation You need effective f.l. of complete objective.
 

Offline mikeselectricstuff

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Had a look at the schematic. Debouncing of the buttons will be done in VHDL via a filter in the FPGA? In the microcontroller unit it is an annoying task to debounce something.
Buttons pull-ups and debouncing capacitors are at the P-board (peripheral). Of course, there is additional debouncing logic in the HDL design. Agree, filtering buttons by internal mcu is a poor idea.


Debouncing entirely in software is trivially easy - you simply sample the buttons every 20-40mS or so.

« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 11:13:27 am by mikeselectricstuff »
Youtube channel:Taking wierd stuff apart. Very apart.
Mike's Electric Stuff: High voltage, vintage electronics etc.
Day Job: Mostly LEDs
 

Offline tmbinc

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I would be _really_ curious about firmware dumps of these devices, or any specification that go beyond the two-page summaries.
A few years ago, after I did a teardown video on one of these, someone emailed me, with some info they'd reverse-engineered, but didn't want to publish due to ITAR concerns.
The main point was that they had found that the original FPGA used a Microblaze core, and it was easy to find the code image in the flash memory, and after disassembling with IDA, they managed to reverse-engineer the handshake protocol used to authenticate the camera with the control box.
There might be some useful insights in to how any sensor-unique data is stored.
Hi Mike, yes, that was me. I've since then published my findings - in slightly redacted form - in https://www.eevblog.com/forum/thermal-imaging/autoliv-nv2-on-raspberry-pi/.

However, my question specifically is a.) about the NV3 family, and b.) more specifcally the FLIR PathFindIR II, and how it differs from the automotive NV3 that we've all seen.
 


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