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Question about FLIR One for Android

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Ben321:
Now that FLIR has finally released it (not just for pre-sale anymore), has anybody managed to make a USB driver for Windows for it yet? I remember with the Seek Thermal imager, somebody managed to (after connecting it to their PC's USB port, via a USB-A to micro-USB cable) create Windows drivers for it, so that it was usable on the PC as a webcam. Has anybody yet managed to do the same thing with the FLIR One for Android, which (like the Seek Thermal) has a micro-USB connector on it?

Ben321:
50 views and no replies? I think there was an entire thread, several pages long, regarding 3rd party drivers for the Seek Thermal imager. I'd think this would be a hot topic, but nobody has replied yet. I'd think somebody would be trying to accomplish the same thing with the FLIR One for Android, but there seems to be little interest, as evidenced by the fact that this thread is on the second page of the Test Equipment section, and yet has no replies (other than the one I'm posting now, for the purpose of putting it back on the first page).

encryptededdy:
I think due to the use of a Lepton sensor, those who are interesting in integrating thermal imaging into some kind of product or for some kind of static PC-connected setup are just waiting for FLIR to officially release the Lepton 3 for sale. We already know PureEngineering/GroupGets has their hands on a Lepton 3 module and developed a USB <-> Lepton 3 interface board. https://vine.co/v/edPq5ZD9aO7



Also I can't see much use in connecting the FLIR One Gen 2 to a PC... with the Seek we could use it to increase image quality, fix the gradient, and get raw data out. However with the FLIR One I doubt there's much to be improved on in terms of IQ (due to FLIR's already heavy image processing done in-module) and it also saves radiometric JPEGs with full raw data.

Ben321:

--- Quote from: encryptededdy on October 05, 2015, 01:40:42 am ---I think due to the use of a Lepton sensor, those who are interesting in integrating thermal imaging into some kind of product or for some kind of static PC-connected setup are just waiting for FLIR to officially release the Lepton 3 for sale. We already know PureEngineering/GroupGets has their hands on a Lepton 3 module and developed a USB <-> Lepton 3 interface board. https://vine.co/v/edPq5ZD9aO7



Also I can't see much use in connecting the FLIR One Gen 2 to a PC... with the Seek we could use it to increase image quality, fix the gradient, and get raw data out. However with the FLIR One I doubt there's much to be improved on in terms of IQ (due to FLIR's already heavy image processing done in-module) and it also saves radiometric JPEGs with full raw data.

--- End quote ---

Even so, for those who want a simple way of doing it, without soldering (as you would need to do with the USB interface board you have been speaking of), having an already existing module (like the FLIR One for Android) would be a great thing. Also, you can get raw, unprocessed thermal image, if you create your own reverse engineered driver for the FLIR One for Android on the PC. And I want that raw, unprocessed data, and I don't want to have to use a soldered project board (like the one you were talking about) to do it. Using a PC driver created from info gathered by reverse engineering it the FLIR One for Android, I would be able to use an already assembled thermal module, that costs very little money, and requires absolutely ZERO soldering, in order to capture true thermal images. So consider this thread a request to all reverse engineers out there, to get on with reverse engineering the FLIR One for Android, so that I will be able to use it ultimately as a thermal webcam for doing all kinds of fun experiments.

One of the things about using the official software on an Android device is that it resizes the thermal image prior to embedding it in a JPEG. You see, the "FLIR One for Android"'s actual output is a 160x120 thermal image that comes out of the USB port, and is then processes by the FLIR One app on an Android device. Part of the processing is to interpolate the 160x120 thermal raw pixels to a 320x240 image. This interpolation is done prior to saving in the radiometric JPEG file, but it is done by the app, NOT by the microcontroller in the "FLIR One for Android" hardware (or at least I hope that's the case). If you can reverse engineer the USB communication protocol used by the FLIR One for Android, and then write your own driver for it for a PC, you SHOULD be able to access the truly RAW (160x120) thermal pixels data stream from the device. As nice as it is to have an image that is bigger than 160x120, doubling the resolution to 320x240 is in effect falsifying scientific data, meaning that it's basically useless for anything other than taking thermal pictures for fun. At this point, saving it as a thermometric JPEG image (as if the data was scientifically valid) is a quite deceptive practice. It give the false impression that the data is actually useful for measuring real temperatures. It is not. It only gives you APPROXIMATE temperatures (which any true scientist would laugh at).

But if I can access (via PC drivers, created through reverse engineering), the actual 160x120 raw thermal image data, I will have my hands on actual usable scientific data. And I will be guarantied that the temperatures calculated from this data are completely accurate.

And by the way, I've never heard of a Lepton 3. I haven't even heard of a Lepton 2. I've just heard of a Lepton, and that the new version with double the horizontal and vertical resolution (160x120, instead of 80x60) is still just called the Lepton. FLIR does not seem to number its newer versions of cores. I can't find any official naming of the Lepton 3 on FLIR's website.

encryptededdy:
Lepton 2 is the 80x60 one we currently have access to. Lepton 3 is the new 160x120 one. They appear to be just internal FLIR names, so you won't find them on the FLIR website. See this document.

At least groupget's previous breakout boards were all sold pre-soldered and ready to use. See: https://groupgets.com/manufacturers/groupgets-labs/products/flir-lepton-breakout-board-v1-4

Here is the full datasheet for Lepton 3: http://media.wix.com/ugd/53cdb6_5191be73d1c943d78d2e1a095cb7f3b8.pdf

According to that, the Lepton 3 does output 160x120 data over voSPI (page 38), so the upscaling must be done in the app or the hardware of the FLIR One.

To be honest, I don't understand your issue with the upscaling. While it's true that native resolution data is the most optimal, if we consider the issues with sharpness on the Lepton's lens (see the FLIR One G2 actual resolution thread) making the sensor only resolve details similarly to a ~120x90 sensor (even though the sensor really is 160x120) and the fact that the Lepton's temperature accuracy is ±2 degrees C, I doubt the upscaling makes any appreciable difference to the observed accuracy of the temperature readings.

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