Author Topic: Thermal imaging in mainstream media  (Read 519 times)

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Offline Ultrapurple

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Thermal imaging in mainstream media
« on: July 07, 2020, 02:46:20 pm »
How often does thermal imaging come up in mainstream media?

I found myself wondering this today as BBC News 24 (UK) ran a short feature about improving the insulation of the nation's housing stock. The thermal image used was a pan across an anonymous - though probably well-heeled - row of houses. I've attached a still from part of the pan, which I screen-grabbed from a stream I was watching on a spare monitor attached to the work PC. The stream was only relatively low resolution (~VGA) but the thermal image looked quite good - I'm guessing it was roughly 640x480 class.

There must be lots of occasions when thermal imaging gets a mention but we have no feeling for how often it occurs. So here's a challenge: if you happen to see some mainstream media, take a photo or screendump or whatever and post it here, clearly labelled with the source, eg

Source: BBC TV
Media: TV (24h news stream channel BBC News 24)
Date (ISO1 format): 2020-07-07
Local time (if relevant): 12:10pm


1ISO 8601 date format: yyyy-mm-dd


Please add to the list as you come across stuff. NB: for the purposes of this page, please exclude things like advertising, social media, YouTube, press releases and so on and stick to editorial content.

« Last Edit: July 07, 2020, 03:04:36 pm by Ultrapurple »
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Offline agh768

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Re: Thermal imaging in mainstream media
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2020, 07:11:52 am »
BBC has the watches series  Springwatch, Autumnwatch and Winterwatch.

they have used super tele infrared equipment on those shoots quite often also as live cameras.

also for various bbc documentatries ir cams have been used. some really high resolution ones
 

Offline Hydron

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Re: Thermal imaging in mainstream media
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2020, 05:01:19 pm »
How about hotspot in cricket? From wikipedia (and just looking at the images on TV) it looks like they use MWIR cooled cameras at a fairly high frame rate - must be a pain for them to deal with export licensing, possibly why they don't get used as much any more or in some of the more difficult locations (cricket is popular in some fairly diverse regions!)

Also not exactly "media", but the film Sicario has a sequence near the end with a MWIR camera - I could tell when watching that it wasn't an uncooled LWIR camera by the depth of field. Looking it up later it seems they used a FLIR HD scientific cooled MWIR unit (can't remember exactly which) - certainly not something man-worn as suggested in the film!
« Last Edit: July 08, 2020, 05:05:05 pm by Hydron »
 

Offline Vipitis

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Offline Jenny

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Re: Thermal imaging in mainstream media
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2020, 11:46:39 am »
Why no one mentioned wildlife footages? They have the most insane picture quality I’ve ever seen for a thermal camera. Just some examples:


Seems they are all long range MWIR cameras, or even high end in that category? Not only the resolution, but also the really natural looking, making my device just like a toy.  :palm:
 

Offline Vipitis

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Re: Thermal imaging in mainstream media
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2020, 11:01:56 pm »
the first one says it in the video right there. That is an Selex Hawk pretty much the cricket thing.

For the Thermoteknix samples it is a little more difficult. those are not cooled WMIR cameras. In fact here is the whole episode where some of those shots seem to originate from: https://curiositystream.com/video/1857/survivors timestamp 20:00 for the first thermal shot. But I am not sure about the cameras used. First party says it was MIRICLE 307K cores (25µm pixels) while there is also a video and a product that got released and is still linked, but now no longer exists. archived.
 

Offline David Hess

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Re: Thermal imaging in mainstream media
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2020, 01:47:56 am »
At some point I worry that public availability will undo the US Supreme Court decision Kyllo v. United States where a thermal infrared scan is considered a search for purposes of requiring a warrant.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kyllo_v._United_States

The dissent thought this line was "unnecessary, unwise, and inconsistent with the Fourth Amendment"[4] because according to Scalia's previous logic, this firm but bright line would be defunct as soon as the surveillance technology used went into general public use, which was still undefined.
 


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