Author Topic: 1982 Navigation Computer | S-100 Bus?  (Read 1397 times)

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Offline pamperchu

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1982 Navigation Computer | S-100 Bus?
« on: July 24, 2018, 03:03:16 pm »
I found an old navigation computer from the early 80s. I think it's a variation of the S-100 bus. came with 2 CPU cards, an 8088 and an 8085, plus a few other boards, I/O and keyboard controller.

History lesson;
Loran-C was a hyperbolic radio navigation system which allowed a receiver to determine its position by listening to low frequency radio signals transmitted by fixed land-based radio beacons.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loran-C


It should be able to connect with TTY via the serial COM interface. Very interested in moding some of the system hardware

More Pictures
https://imgur.com/a/Ox0FsH9
 

Online rrinker

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Re: 1982 Navigation Computer | S-100 Bus?
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2018, 11:33:33 pm »
 Don't think it's S-100, unless I miscounted, the pulled card in the imgur library has 43 pins per side, 86 pin edge card connector.

Neat piece of gear to play around with though.
 
 

Offline pamperchu

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Re: 1982 Navigation Computer | S-100 Bus?
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2018, 04:37:39 am »
http://www.retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/s100bus.html

Under " S-100 books and documents"

"Bill Godbout, founder of Compupro and George Morrow of Morrow worked on the IEEE-696 bus design, we have many manuals of those products. A discussion of pins 20 and 70 on the original Altair bus, which supported front-panel memory write protect, is in this document. My S-100 home page links to other documents of interest. "


If it is something else, or if anyone knows exactly what system bus it is, please let me know.


Edit; some information on Marrow computers
http://www.retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/d_morrow.html
« Last Edit: July 25, 2018, 04:41:10 am by pamperchu »
 

Offline ebastler

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Re: 1982 Navigation Computer | S-100 Bus?
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2018, 05:01:05 am »
Bill Godbout, founder of Compupro and George Morrow of Morrow worked on the IEEE-696 bus design,

I don't think this was the same Morrow. It seems that George Morrow staid in the microcomputer business for quite a bit longer, using various company names and computer brands (https://www.pc-history.org/cpm.htm). During the same time period, the Loran systems were developed by "II Morrow Inc" in Oregon, which later ended up with Garmin (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garmin).

Hence, I don't see any necessary link between the S-100 bus and your LLC-4000.
 

Offline pamperchu

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Re: 1982 Navigation Computer | S-100 Bus?
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2018, 08:06:35 am »
LOL, ok so I don't have any clue now what system it is, besides being an 8088/85.  Ill take a dump of the ROMs soon and see what I can find in them.
 

Online duak

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Re: 1982 Navigation Computer | S-100 Bus?
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2018, 10:02:57 am »
I think it could be an Intel Multibus based system - who else would have an 8088/85?  (Actually, a friend had an S100 card in the early 80's, but it wasn't Multibus)

I believe Multibus was codified as IEEE-796.  I think later versions went to pin/socket connectors like Eurocard/VME.

BTW, I've always thought that Blunderbus was a good name and used it for a project in college.


 
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Offline nad007007

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Re: 1982 Navigation Computer | S-100 Bus?
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2019, 08:50:39 pm »
This is interesting 8088
 


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