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What was the very first computer you owned or used ?

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SiliconWizard:
As we can see, this all depends on the country and language used. Terms equivalent to "condenser" are still very common in many other languages than english. It's probably at least partly a cultural thing only. And add to the mix that "condenser" has more words than one in some languages. For instance, in french, "condensateur" is how we call a "capacitor", but some other uses of the term "condenser" in english, such as for gas condensing, have a different word. We call that a "condenseur" in french, so that's two different words. The fact there was only one word in english for both uses probably is what led to this term "capacitor". That makes sense.

ferdieCX:
In Spanish, the most commonly used word is  " condensador ", some people say also "capacitor "

garrettm:
If I'm not mistaken, it was Alessandro Volta who coined the term condenser. So blame the Italians... Later, Oliver Heaviside coined the term "permittance" for the storage of electrostatic energy. He also pulled a Shakespeare and made up most of the terms we still use to describe most electrical quantities:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Heaviside#Electromagnetic_terms

I quite enjoyed reading Heaviside's work (Electromagnetic Theory Vols I and II). The man had a razor sharp wit and hated quaternions with a passion. See page 7 for a good laugh:

https://ia904607.us.archive.org/28/items/electromagnetict01heavrich/electromagnetict01heavrich.pdf

Page 134 gives a good overview of his dislike for quaternions:

"But I came later to see that, so far as the vector analysis I required was concerned, the quaternion was not only not required, but was a positive evil of no inconsiderable magnitude; and that by its avoidance the establishment of vector analysis was made quite simple and its working also simplified, and that it could be conveniently harmonised with ordinary Cartesian work. There is not a ghost of a quaternion in any of my papers (except in one, for a special purpose). The vector analysis I use may be described either as a convenient and systematic abbreviation of Cartesian analysis; or else, as Quaternions without the quaternions, and with a simplified notation harmonising with Cartesians. In this form, it is not more difficult, but easier to work than Cartesians. Of course you must learn how to work it. Initially, unfamiliarity may make it difficult. But no amount of familiarity will make Quaternions an easy subject."

Neomys Sapiens:

--- Quote from: garrettm on March 01, 2022, 03:58:04 am ---If I'm not mistaken, it was Alessandro Volta who coined the term condenser. So blame the Italians... Later, Oliver Heaviside coined the term "permittance" for the storage of electrostatic energy. He also pulled a Shakespeare and made up most of the terms we still use to describe most electrical quantities:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oliver_Heaviside#Electromagnetic_terms

I quite enjoyed reading Heaviside's work (Electromagnetic Theory Vols I and II). The man had a razor sharp wit and hated quaternions with a passion. See page 7 for a good laugh:

https://ia904607.us.archive.org/28/items/electromagnetict01heavrich/electromagnetict01heavrich.pdf

Page 134 gives a good overview of his dislike for quaternions:

"But I came later to see that, so far as the vector analysis I required was concerned, the quaternion was not only not required, but was a positive evil of no inconsiderable magnitude; and that by its avoidance the establishment of vector analysis was made quite simple and its working also simplified, and that it could be conveniently harmonised with ordinary Cartesian work. There is not a ghost of a quaternion in any of my papers (except in one, for a special purpose). The vector analysis I use may be described either as a convenient and systematic abbreviation of Cartesian analysis; or else, as Quaternions without the quaternions, and with a simplified notation harmonising with Cartesians. In this form, it is not more difficult, but easier to work than Cartesians. Of course you must learn how to work it. Initially, unfamiliarity may make it difficult. But no amount of familiarity will make Quaternions an easy subject."

--- End quote ---
I'm totally with Mr. Heaviside here. One project on which I was working involved a computation which could supposedly only achieved by the method of quaternion transformation. To furnish the necessary algorithm, a professor of mathematics which also operated as a consultant was applied. When we met with him over lunch, he got a bit carried away about his vectors and quaternions and started to illustrate things with multiple pieces of cutlery. When he asked his neighbour to  join him in order to depict more variables, we returned the topic forcibly to 'when will we get the code and how much will it cost'. It was a very close brush with one sort of 'crazy scientist'.

CatalinaWOW:
I am not an expert on any type of rotational transforms, but where I worked quaternions were widely used in motion simulation.  The stated reason was that quaternions avoided the division by zero problems that occur in Euler transforms and others for certain rotations.  Can't say if this is true, but if so it is a reason well worth whatever extra effort is involved in setup. 

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