Author Topic: Any work for someone with Electronics experience?(doesnt have 2B in electronics)  (Read 952 times)

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Offline treez

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Hi
My employer has  terminated my employment, partly because of corona, and partly because in the project we were working on, I imparted enough knowledge that they could easily go on and finish the power supply by themselves (the guy most probably could have done it by himself anyway, even if I had never gone there in the first place).

I qualified with an Electronics & Communications degree in UK in 2002 {BEng (I) Hons}. I have worked in over 30 UK based Electronics companies.

Anyway,  I am finding the job market  very  dead even though I will go pretty much anywhere UK, Germany, Austria, Switz, Belgium, USA, Aus. etc, I speak a little German.

I am now applying for minimum wage cleaning type  jobs etc , but they are pushing me away because they say I don’t have enough cleaning  (or whatever) experience.

Is anyone in the same situation?  (I assume many are, due to Corona)….is there any kind of employment that  electronics engineers,  in this situation,   can do? Please tell if you know of it?

Most of my electronics experience was in Switch Mode Power Supplies. Also do general analog electronics hardware. Also, smallish PIC C programs. Also, PCB Layout (Eagle Pro)


« Last Edit: June 13, 2020, 08:40:04 pm by treez »
 

Online tggzzz

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I qualified with an Electronics & Communications degree in UK in 2002 {BEng (I) Hons}. I have worked in over 30 UK based Electronics companies.

The institution matters. More than 1.5 employers/year needs explanation.

Have a look at any professional instution you belong to, e.g. IET.

Unemployment is going to be a bloodbath, for the obvious two reasons that we don't need to discuss here.
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
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Offline treez

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More than 1.5 employers/year needs explanation.
Thanks, yes, often i worked on a project, where as soon as they could see how to continue it themselves, then  i was terminated, since there was no point having more poeple than needed on the project, for reasons of "protection of IP". -specially if it was a new project in a new market, and secrecy was understandably essential.
I was perfectly happy to comply with this, and just then had to find work elsewhere.

My shortest  job was 1 month, it involved fixing a power supply sent into a consultancy by a customer.
The  current sense transformer was the wrong way round.
There was no slope compensation so I added that.
The Gate drives needed adjustment so I did that.
The inductor  values needed increasing so I did that.
It took one day to do this…but they let me stay for a month and go to their xmas do at a curry house called cushy’s in Dunfermline….a great curry.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2020, 11:30:44 am by treez »
 

Offline tpowell1830

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Hi Treez, Don't know if you would be interested, but here is an ad on EEVBlog Forum that may work for you.

https://www.eevblog.com/forum/jobs/electronics-technichian-needed-near-lehigh-valley-pa/msg0/?topicseen#new
PEACE===>T
 
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Offline Kjelt

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Treez whatever you do make sure they don't link you to this forum, I would ask the mods to delete this topic or remove the specifics in your previous posts.
The reason I am saying this is because you made numerous topics that are rather not flattering for your employer which will make it harder to get a new job.
Good luck.
 
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Online nctnico

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More than 1.5 employers/year needs explanation.
Thanks, yes, often i worked on a project, where as soon as they could see how to continue it themselves, then  i was terminated, since there was no point having more poeple than needed on the project, for reasons of "protection of IP". -specially if it was a new project in a new market, and secrecy was understandably essential.
I was perfectly happy to comply with this, and just then had to find work elsewhere.
Why aren't you self employed yet? It seems you have been doing that for a long time already but didn't got paid accordingly. OTOH it is strange that no employer has held onto you. So either you suck at electronics or your specialism isn't needed full-time. The latter can be fixed by widening your field.
There are small lies, big lies and then there is what is on the screen of your oscilloscope.
 
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Offline fcb

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Sorry to hear this treez.  Sadly I think this will be a common story in the UK, especially when furlough scheme ends.

Had a discussion here about employing an EE and taking on an apprentice - but without moving building (uggghhh) we can't figure out how to do genuine social distancing.  Suspect alot of companies will be in the same boat - so perhaps look to offer your skills remotely???  A sort of Mr Make-It-Work on SMPSU designs.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2020, 01:28:36 pm by fcb »
https://electron.plus Power Analysers, VI Signature Testers, Voltage References.
 
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Offline schmitt trigger

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Sorry, Trees. I also feel your pain because I am also loosing my job.

There was a famous book in the 1990s: Who moved my cheese?

In a nutshell, change is inevitable, but in modern times it happens really fast.
What used to take a lifetime or at least during a generation, nowadays happens within months.

So let's move on to the next cheese location. For me personally, this means that electronics will remain only as a hobby, and breadwinning will mean a different activity.
 
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Offline treez

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Sorry Schmitt Trigger , i am sorry to hear it.....i hope whatever you do works out as well as it possibly can.
 

Online tom66

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I am sorry to say this, but if you have been through 30 employers in 18 years, then the problem isn't that employers found that they could do it after a few months, it's probably because you weren't a right fit for the company or didn't have the right skills.  A degree is one element - how much experience have you had in engineering development?  Can you show a portfolio of projects?  Personal work and experience is also key.

I have never heard of a company that willfully churns through engineers every 6-12 months, excepting a rare exception of one company with a boss with severe NPD who had been through 8 engineers (myself included - I managed 2 weeks) in a sub-5 year timespan.  Many companies are paying recruiters to find talent, or if they are not then they are dedicating their time of their engineers/managers/HR staff to finding that talent, which is expensive.  And it is often said that an engineer (indeed this is true for most professional fields) is a net cost for the first 3-6 months because they require other engineers' time and don't produce much work in that timespan. So it would make for some really stupid policy if a company hired you for only a few months only to replace you when done. Even contract engineering positions are rarely shorter than 6 months, and that's usually to fill in for a missing employee due to mat/paternity leave or something like that.
 
Do you mind posting an anonymised CV, we might be able to give advice.  For what it's worth, while hiring rates have dropped, employers are still looking for and hiring the right people.  Most employers however seem to only be replacing people that leave, rather than expanding, due to the economic uncertainty.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2020, 09:48:13 pm by tom66 »
 
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Online tggzzz

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Do you mind posting an anonymised CV, we might be able to give advice.

Despite a certain morbid net-curtain-twitching interest in that, I have to say I think posting it here would be a mistake. I suspect even an HRdroid would be able to de-anonymise such a CV.
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
Having fun doing more, with less
 
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Offline treez

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And it is often said that an engineer (indeed this is true for most professional fields) is a net cost for the first 3-6 months because they require other engineers' time and don't produce much work in that timespan.

…There is a company going very strong now, selling three main products like hot cakes,  which I fixed up in less than three months. One was an EMC fix, 2, A Mains Transient improvement, and 3, A Comms system which wasn’t working.

I think with SMPS its different, as they are generally very quick to design or fix, and often have existing engineers who can easily take it forward once someone has “gotten them over the threshold”.

At one company, I solved a long term problem in a few days…..they were developing a 600W current source power supply. (LT8705 based Buck-or-boost converter) They  had omitted  to add open_load protection to it. (This is not good  because having output overvoltage protection for the case of open_load is a basic standard procedure for a current source power supply).
The problem was that each time the power supply  was inadvertently started up on no_load, the output voltage rose  up too high, and  subsequently  ‘killed’  the FETs which went short. They were using current limited lab power supplies to supply it, so this damage happened  with the FETs “dying” silently. Anyway, they kept on finding themselves with damaged FETs and wondering why. The FETs were QFN style and only one person in the company was  permitted to replace them. This board  had spent most of its time on the “to be repaired” shelf. (6 months)
Therefore, I implemented open load protection for this power supply, and this solved the problem.

At another company, they were developing there first major product, they had a great engineer, who could easily do the job himself….they didn’t want another engineer coming in as they wanted to keep it secret…however, Vicor wouldn’t support them because they were putting more than 8  modules in parallel……so they brought me in for the development, just in case……as it happened we did it no problem, so  they parted company with me after the 2 months that it too to piece it together.

Ditto many others

I had  one company that were shipping a product in which the micro was sometimes browning out because its R/Z/NPN regulator had too high a base resistor…that  was diagnosed within the first hour.

For one company, i fixed their problem at the interview...before even starting work....
A company had had some LED driver boards designed by a consultancy. These were Buck LED drivers, with 20V absolute maximum input voltage pins. There was an LC filter upstream of the LED drivers. This board was powered by a 12V OffTheShelf Power supply.
The boards were suffering a high field and production failure rate.
During the interview, I realised that the problem was possibly that every now and then , the production staff were “hot-plugging” the power supply in to the LED driver PCB. This could result in a >20V peak voltage ring on the Buck converter ICs. This turned out to be the case, and indeed the cause of the problem.
As a solution, Initially, it was decided to ensure that no “hot-plugging” took place in production. (The power supply’s soft start  then ensured that no overvoltage occurred at startup)
I also provided an alternative  design schematic with protection such that even when “Hot-plugged”, no overvoltage ringing would occur.


« Last Edit: June 24, 2020, 08:59:36 pm by treez »
 

Offline Bud

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Treez whatever you do make sure they don't link you to this forum, I would ask the mods to delete this topic or remove the specifics in your previous posts.
The reason I am saying this is because you made numerous topics that are rather not flattering for your employer which will make it harder to get a new job.
Good luck.
It is an urban myth that employers would be interested in reading your posts on every forum you are member of. HR drones have no clue of tech talks gibberish.  Unless you are applying for an undercover FBI agent job i would not bother.
Facebook-free life and Rigol-free shack.
 
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Online tggzzz

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Treez whatever you do make sure they don't link you to this forum, I would ask the mods to delete this topic or remove the specifics in your previous posts.
The reason I am saying this is because you made numerous topics that are rather not flattering for your employer which will make it harder to get a new job.
Good luck.
It is an urban myth that employers would be interested in reading your posts on every forum you are member of. HR drones have no clue of tech talks gibberish.  Unless you are applying for an undercover FBI agent job i would not bother.

I have come across competent HR people, but they are a minority. Nonetheless, that is a reasonable point.

A more realistic scenario is that, because treez' experience is concentrated in a small domain, techies that read forums might notice correspondences and raise questions - and pass them to HRdrones.

Given what treez has mentioned about his achievements, it surprises me that he is not already a freelance consultancy business. That question will be asked by HRdroids when they look at his CV.
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
Having fun doing more, with less
 
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Offline fcb

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Treez, what you are describing sounds more like frelance PSU trouble shooting - why would you actually want to be employed directly by the company.

Sounds like you would be much better suited to a consultants life - set yourself up a Ltd company & domain and specialise in PSU problem solving in the Cambridge area.
https://electron.plus Power Analysers, VI Signature Testers, Voltage References.
 
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Offline treez

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Hi,
Thanks, yes i used to work in the Science Park in Cambridge.
Strangely i never got the impression there was much electronics there.......more kind of..science.

I also worked in a tiny company doing a lot of analog stuff just outside Cambridge....in approx mid 2000, and i remember all the (huge) schems were beautifully hand drawn.

Quite a few of my ex -colleagues have got Electronics work in Romania, do you know if there's much Electronics there?
« Last Edit: June 25, 2020, 02:14:22 pm by treez »
 


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