Author Topic: EET grad looking for work in North America  (Read 14946 times)

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Offline ratdude747

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EET grad looking for work in North America
« on: August 06, 2015, 02:50:42 am »
I recently graduated from Purdue University's College of Technology with  a BS in Electrical Engineering Technology (Yes, they are ABET accredited).

My background (elective classes,final projects, etc.) is in controls (PLCs and process control techniques), embedded programming (C on Atmel AVR especially), and communications/RF. I'd prefer to focus on embedded electronics but honestly I'll consider a much wider variety of positions.

I'd prefer to stay in the Midwestern United States (Indiana especially), but I'm open to moving to any location that speaks English (domestic and abroad).

My senior capstone project was the re-engineering of an inductively heated vacuum casting machine; it involved reverse engineering of analog, digital, and power electronics, conversion of such to a modern design (which included embedded programming), design of a new PCB, and troubleshooting of the system.

My resume (which includes other info) is attached to this post. The highly detailed final report of the aforementioned project is available upon request (not attached due to file size).
« Last Edit: August 06, 2015, 10:42:11 pm by ratdude747 »
 

Offline T3sl4co1l

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #1 on: August 06, 2015, 08:01:57 am »
Curious, was the induction heating in association with a company?

Tim
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Offline ratdude747

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #2 on: August 06, 2015, 09:54:15 pm »
^Yes and No. It was for a 3rd party, who bought the machine (made for jewelry) to cast model engine parts. The machine was missing the control circuitry, which is why the project existed in the first place.

He also owns his own design/prototyping firm and his employees were working on it before I did, so in a way it was for a company? With small businesses like this, the line between personal projects and company projects is quite blurry.
 

Offline ratdude747

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2015, 04:45:54 pm »
3 months later, still looking. I'd post more but in fear of a potential employer judging my opinion I am not posting more on the subject (although this may get me judged anyway, talk about a catch 22).
 

Offline John_ITIC

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2015, 09:50:55 pm »
Ok, so here's my take on this: You need to market yourself better. Nobody will get impressed by a one-page resume, especially not after one-shot post. I know from experience that one thinks that people should be impressed by ones accomplishments because one went through so much struggle to get that degree in the first place. Here's the thing: nobody cares. There are hundreds and thousands of engineers with the same or better skills competing for the same jobs. What you have to do is to *market* your services much better. Create a super-impressive web site. Create videos, show-casing what you know and your personality, create articles, etc. Use Internet and the "new media" as a TV (promotion) rather than a mailbox (sending resume). Hiring managers will only pay attention when they see something that stands out from the masses. This applies to any product or service out there.

Watch some of the below:

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=dan+s+kennedy

1480A USB 2.0 LS/FS/HS/OTG 1.3 Protocol Analyzer - $695 USD
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Offline ratdude747

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2015, 05:59:02 am »
Ok, so here's my take on this: You need to market yourself better. Nobody will get impressed by a one-page resume, especially not after one-shot post. I know from experience that one thinks that people should be impressed by ones accomplishments because one went through so much struggle to get that degree in the first place. Here's the thing: nobody cares. There are hundreds and thousands of engineers with the same or better skills competing for the same jobs. What you have to do is to *market* your services much better. Create a super-impressive web site. Create videos, show-casing what you know and your personality, create articles, etc. Use Internet and the "new media" as a TV (promotion) rather than a mailbox (sending resume). Hiring managers will only pay attention when they see something that stands out from the masses. This applies to any product or service out there.

Watch some of the below:

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=dan+s+kennedy

I am somewhat skeptical of your advice (at least in my specific case). Three serious issues:

1. I am not very good on camera. Not my strong point. My voice isn't good (never has been long story) among other issues. I worry that I may project what may be seen as bad people skills, the last thing I want to do.

2. Resources. I'm no video editing expert, and on top of that, my camera requirement is not good. Not to mention I work 9-12 hour night shifts four nights a week. I struggle to find time to look for openings, let alone make a bunch of youtube videos (and do them justice).

3. Viewers. Why/how would a potential employer see my videos? I see such as analogous to stapling flyers to telephone poles; it's a small advertisement that has a decent chance of not being seen.

Not to say doing such would not help... I just don't think it is worth the opportunity cost do such. Sure, applying to a bunch of listings (and doing a serious cover letter for each) hasn't gotten me far; it feels like a freaking supermarket sweepstakes drawing. However, I want to make sure that I use my resources wisely and not waste my time on things that won't get seen.
 

Offline CatalinaWOW

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #6 on: November 11, 2015, 06:32:12 pm »
Congratulations on your degree.  One of the best engineers I know possesses the same resume.

You haven't said much about how you have marketed yourself.  While I would value your degree the HR departments at many large companies automatically deselect EET degrees (some do prefer them but they are in a minority).  HR departments in general are far more motivated to prevent a bad hire than to achieve a good hire.  They find it easy to reject someone who is not a perfect paper fit and difficult to find the talent behind the paper.  And as said before they have many, many resumes to sort through.  You have to somehow penetrate the HR barrier. 

Have you looked up the companies that do electronic design work in your preferred geographic areas?  Used your contacts at Purdue and elsewhere to find contacts in the engineering/manufacturing departments of those companies?  Searched public documents to find the engineering manager or managers?  Written letters to those individuals showing your knowledge of those companies products and your interest in participating their development?  Photographs, code snippets, schematics of your project might be useful in this context.

Given your experience with a small business you may also want to pursue a path that a few I know have pursued successfully.  They visit small businesses in the area, ask what their problems are, and then sell them solutions.  Basically doing what you did for your senior project, only getting paid this time.
 

Offline ratdude747

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #7 on: November 11, 2015, 07:00:13 pm »
I did most of those. Often I include a PDF of my senior project report which has source code and everything (Gantt charts, flow charts, schematic, etc.)

I am well aware of anti-EET bias.  |O
 

Online Tomorokoshi

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #8 on: November 13, 2015, 04:59:41 am »
A few comments:

On the resume, split "Work / Volunteer Experience" into "Work Experience" and "Volunteer Experience".

LabVIEW is listed in one of the volunteer jobs. How extensive was it? Can more detail be added? Is it enough to make it to the major skills list?

For PLC experience, list some that you worked with. AB? Siemens? etc.

There are still a lot of industrial shops around. Track down things like "integrators", "distributors", and the like of industrial equipment used in factories. There may be some PLC opportunities there. Also track down manufacturers that might be using PLC equipment. There may be more than you expect, and they don't advertise the work - they just try to contract it out to various shops.

Add Windows / PC experience to the list. I know, but don't let pride get in the way.

Buy a $50 Microchip PIC eval kit and tinker with it for a weekend. Then you can add Microchip experience to the list.
 

Offline Scrts

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2015, 02:15:57 pm »
Would you be interested in automotive position in Michigan?
 

Offline ratdude747

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2015, 04:18:19 pm »
Would you be interested in automotive position in Michigan?

Perhaps. PM/Post details?
 

Offline ratdude747

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2015, 05:06:37 pm »
Here's an updated resume, FYI.

(edit- found a bug, fixed it)
« Last Edit: December 04, 2015, 05:09:38 pm by ratdude747 »
 

Offline Scrts

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #12 on: December 07, 2015, 03:24:48 am »
Well, you can check for positions here: http://www.valeo.com/en/candidates/our-job-offers/#job-search
Select USA. I am in Comfort and Driving Assistance group, but you may find some other business groups interesting.
 

Offline Neganur

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #13 on: December 07, 2015, 03:16:11 pm »
Isn't it sad that the way you learn to write a CV is totally not what the industry wants to see?
 

Offline ratdude747

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #14 on: December 07, 2015, 08:34:25 pm »
Isn't it sad that the way you learn to write a CV is totally not what the industry wants to see?

No, rather that it doesn't say what they want to see. Mainly in that it doesn't have me graduated 2-3 years prior with 2-3's experience in whatever specific displine they want . It seems that entry level means 2-3 years work expereince. So where do I get that experience (on paper, I already have some but it isn't technically countable)? I already graduated so an internship is pretty much not an option. Seems like a catch 22. Sounds like I better get lucky (shame all my contacts through IEEE are in academia, not exactly the sort who can get me in with just a BS).

I hope I don't sound too depressed. Seeing all your classmates get jobs and you get nothing isn't the best for self esteem. I know I will get a job. At least I tell myself that  |O.
 

Offline cobbler

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2015, 04:12:08 am »
You really need to improve your resume. You need to explain in great detail the technical aspects projects you've worked on and fill it with relevant keywords. I would start from scratch and find some great example resumes.
 

Offline EEVblog

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #16 on: December 13, 2015, 06:35:48 am »
I am somewhat skeptical of your advice (at least in my specific case). Three serious issues:

His advice is bang-on.

Quote
1. I am not very good on camera. Not my strong point. My voice isn't good (never has been long story) among other issues. I worry that I may project what may be seen as bad people skills, the last thing I want to do.

Then don't do videos.
You can still do web pages, write papers, publish in a magazine, contribute to open hardware projects etc.

Quote
2. Resources. I'm no video editing expert, and on top of that, my camera requirement is not good. Not to mention I work 9-12 hour night shifts four nights a week. I struggle to find time to look for openings

Sorry, but no one cares about excuses. Tough world.

Quote
3. Viewers. Why/how would a potential employer see my videos? I see such as analogous to stapling flyers to telephone poles; it's a small advertisement that has a decent chance of not being seen.

You are missing the whole point of stuff like this. It's not that an employer is going to random see your stuff and offer you a job or interview (although that does happen). It's about having something to show on your resume, or more importantly, when you get the interview. It makes you stand out.

Quote
Not to say doing such would not help... I just don't think it is worth the opportunity cost do such. Sure, applying to a bunch of listings (and doing a serious cover letter for each) hasn't gotten me far; it feels like a freaking supermarket sweepstakes drawing.

It is, because you have nothing to stand out.
I've looked at countless resumes over the years, and when you have  dozens or even hundreds to look through they usually get nothing more than a cursory glance. You need something that stands out.

Quote
However, I want to make sure that I use my resources wisely and not waste my time on things that won't get seen.

Anything you do will get seen if you put it in front of people.
 

Offline EEVblog

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #17 on: December 13, 2015, 06:39:48 am »
No, rather that it doesn't say what they want to see. Mainly in that it doesn't have me graduated 2-3 years prior with 2-3's experience in whatever specific displine they want . It seems that entry level means 2-3 years work expereince. So where do I get that experience (on paper, I already have some but it isn't technically countable)?

You've already lost right there.
Not thinking that stuff you've done (hobby or otherwise) does not count means that you lose, and the other person who shows their little home made widget gets the interview.
If you don't have stuff to show, then make stuff to show.
 

Offline snoopy

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #18 on: December 25, 2015, 02:45:55 am »
Isn't it sad that the way you learn to write a CV is totally not what the industry wants to see?

No, rather that it doesn't say what they want to see. Mainly in that it doesn't have me graduated 2-3 years prior with 2-3's experience in whatever specific displine they want . It seems that entry level means 2-3 years work expereince. So where do I get that experience (on paper, I already have some but it isn't technically countable)? I already graduated so an internship is pretty much not an option. Seems like a catch 22. Sounds like I better get lucky (shame all my contacts through IEEE are in academia, not exactly the sort who can get me in with just a BS).

I hope I don't sound too depressed. Seeing all your classmates get jobs and you get nothing isn't the best for self esteem. I know I will get a job. At least I tell myself that  |O.

I used to take along a sample of work from a previous employer or my own business. That was infinitely more valuable than a piece of paper that employers are reluctant to read or are skeptical of, and it always seem to guarantee me a job. But in your case you need to spend some time building something up, writing code etc so that you have something to show a prospective employer. Whilst you are looking for a job this is a perfect opportunity to fill in the time whilst gaining some experience. Don't worry about all your mates getting a job. They are probably good at spinning and selling themselves than you are. Some people are better than this than others. I'm not a good salesman which is why I took examples of my work with me and employers would appreciate that much more than some spin merchant. They would then spend more time pouring over the sample and asking me questions and this is where I excelled because I knew all of the answers ;)

have a great Xmas
cheers and all the best for 2016
 

Offline ratdude747

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #19 on: December 25, 2015, 05:52:55 am »
Isn't it sad that the way you learn to write a CV is totally not what the industry wants to see?

No, rather that it doesn't say what they want to see. Mainly in that it doesn't have me graduated 2-3 years prior with 2-3's experience in whatever specific displine they want . It seems that entry level means 2-3 years work expereince. So where do I get that experience (on paper, I already have some but it isn't technically countable)? I already graduated so an internship is pretty much not an option. Seems like a catch 22. Sounds like I better get lucky (shame all my contacts through IEEE are in academia, not exactly the sort who can get me in with just a BS).

I hope I don't sound too depressed. Seeing all your classmates get jobs and you get nothing isn't the best for self esteem. I know I will get a job. At least I tell myself that  |O.

I used to take along a sample of work from a previous employer or my own business. That was infinitely more valuable than a piece of paper that employers are reluctant to read or are skeptical of, and it always seem to guarantee me a job. But in your case you need to spend some time building something up, writing code etc so that you have something to show a prospective employer. Whilst you are looking for a job this is a perfect opportunity to fill in the time whilst gaining some experience. Don't worry about all your mates getting a job. They are probably good at spinning and selling themselves than you are. Some people are better than this than others. I'm not a good salesman which is why I took examples of my work with me and employers would appreciate that much more than some spin merchant. They would then spend more time pouring over the sample and asking me questions and this is where I excelled because I knew all of the answers ;)

have a great Xmas
cheers and all the best for 2016

That's why I keep a copy of my senior project report in a binder for interviews. It has a couple source codes in it among many other bits of documentation. That said, I've yet to have an interview where source code (or the like) comes up.

Also, Merry Xmas to you too.

A few other notes (names and companies omitted):

-Turns out a buddy of mine in IEEE escaped the academic world and became a project manager at a local controls firm. I ran in to him at the Louisville IEEE Xmas meeting, and he (due a shortage of staff) had me email him my updated resume (which I'm attaching). He in turn gave a very passionate recommendation to HR, which he BCC'd me on. While I haven't heard back (other than a confirmation from HR that they got the files), I ran into another IEEE buddy at the local Ace Hardware (of all places, go figure), who mentioned that he heard they might have something in January. I'm praying that I hear back, as this is a very good opportunity.

-Somebody from a startup in San Francisco who saw this thread emailed me, who was interested in interviewing for a part time bit of embedded work. First, to thou who emailed me, thank you, and I will reply formally to your email soon; I've been busy with family stuff between when I got the email and now. That said, due to travel and cost of living issues, such a job I'd have to work from home as even as an engineer/programmer, (presumably) entry level part time in the bay area is not livable... I'd have to work two more regular jobs  (and my wife a few herself) to make ends meet based on conversations with buddies who have lived there. I really don't know here. While it's encouraging to get a "surprise" email like that,  sadly, I can only play the cards God has dealt me. I can be creative with them, yes, but the situation doesn't allow for a mix of bay area living and part time work. Nothing personal, but I need to be able to feed myself and put a roof over my head. Once again, thanks to the sender of the email; I do appreciate it.
 

Offline kfnight

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #20 on: December 29, 2015, 05:37:38 pm »
When I first started my career I worked for ~5 years doing contract work at 1 to 1.5 year stints. If I was at a company I hated I knew my contract would be up in three months and could look forward to that. If I was at a company that I loved then because I had made good inroads with management I could probably work full-time if I so desired. That part of contract work is great. The other parts--no real benefits or paid vacations, swing shift hours--is not so great.
 

Online IanB

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #21 on: December 29, 2015, 06:02:10 pm »
I already graduated so an internship is pretty much not an option.

Not necessarily. Where I work we sometimes hire freshly trained graduate engineers as interns on a probationary basis, recognizing that it can be difficult to make a reliable hiring decision based just on an interview process. If everything works out well for the candidate and for us, then we will endeavor to convert the internship into a permanent position.

So I would say you should consider applying for internships even as a graduate if you are looking for work. It can get you a foot in the door, it can get you experience, and it may lead to a full time job offer.
I'm not an EE--what am I doing here?
 

Offline ratdude747

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #22 on: December 30, 2015, 03:11:32 am »
I already graduated so an internship is pretty much not an option.

Not necessarily. Where I work we sometimes hire freshly trained graduate engineers as interns on a probationary basis, recognizing that it can be difficult to make a reliable hiring decision based just on an interview process. If everything works out well for the candidate and for us, then we will endeavor to convert the internship into a permanent position.

So I would say you should consider applying for internships even as a graduate if you are looking for work. It can get you a foot in the door, it can get you experience, and it may lead to a full time job offer.

I've heard this advice before, however, I've also heard not to sell oneself short. To race for the top, not the bottom. If I am going to put serious effort towards something, it's going to be something that is in the direction I wish to go. I know I am good, and I'm not going to let this mess ultimately define me.

---

In regards to Dave's (and others) comments on the relavance of hobby-ish work: I was speaking in regards to resumes, not interviews. In interviews, you better beleive it all gets mentioned. Since the main issue has been a lack of interviews, I don't see how this is an issue worth focusing on now. The issue seems to be what I am on paper not jiving with HR people's expectations. They are given some bullsh!t description from the department, they use it to filter stuff. My specifics don't technically match, so I get axed without my true qualities being known. I thought I had a break with the company with who I been recommended within to, however, I honestly wonder if once again I've run out of luck.

In regards to Dave's comments on promoting oneself through the internet, while I don't do videos any more (I did at one point but to be honest, I don't like them), I have done a number of writeups on various forums. I've backed off in recent times, partially due to a sort of burn out of sorts (more below) and partially due to a lot of negative feedback. People saying that "that's a cool little project, good way to kill a weekend" when it was a project I worked on and polished for a month or more. Not to mention that a lot of it was posted under my screename of ratdude747, which is I try to limit my connections to my current existence. That's why my ratdude747 email address isn't on resumes. Due to some of my stuff I posted under that name and the fact that ratdude747 is "not professional", I have to mask myself with the lawrencejbolan email address that is on the resume. So in short, unless I shot myself in the foot by reverting to my "unprofessional" email  or by reposting every single thing I did under a new account, they are severed. My question to those that are in HR or know people in HR: is "ratdude747" a red flag when used as an email address name?

As for the comment on my resume not explaining things, it's a resume, not an essay. It's supposed to be brief bullet points; the cover letter is where the explanation happens.

Another thing I'll note (and have been reluctant to post due to fear of shooting myself in the foot, I've been walking on eggshells this whole time to avoid being too "unprofessional") is that lately (since graduation) I've been honestly burn out on electronics. It's like writer's block only for electronic design. I can't think of anything to design, and when I come close, my mind seems to link that to my failed job hunt and I no longer wish to work on it. This smiley sums it up:  |O .

I used to be passionate about this. I used to be the project's guy at the college who was always getting things to work that nobody else could. I used to be good. Now I'm loosing the battle, so it seems. First to last. Everything I aspired not to be; the superstar in college who is hopeless in the pro leagues. I know I'm good yet I feel that I'm not. Given a task, sure, I can design, prototype, and tweak what's needed (circuitry, code, PCB, etc.), but I can't think of the task to do that with right now.

Also, it seems like people seem to fall into two groups when they meet me and see what I've done and can do: those that think I'm a genius, and those that can hire me. Really frustrating, to have somebody you know praise you and tell about ho much they're impressed  :-+, and then get laughed at  :-DD or ignored  :blah: by HR.

I will note that what you are reading is me at my truly deepest thoughts on the subject (minus all the swearing that would normally be mixed in). This is not how I act in interviews, or what I type in cover letters. I know this isn't how I should think. I know this isn't how I should be. But, right now, it's what I am, at my core, a semi-depressed wreck that is desperately praying to God that I find a way out of this low point.


Hopefully this post doesn't hurt my job hunt, I pray that it, if anything, shows that I wish to be honest even when I risk getting laughed at or looked down upon. You want honesty, here it is.
 

Offline ratdude747

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #23 on: February 16, 2016, 07:56:45 am »
Ok, update time.

Bad news: every position previously mentioned has been a brick wall. Even the one that I got through this thread (and that's all I'll say here). I do have a lead that is sorta going someplace at a smallish Medical, Aerospace, and Defense company local to my area. On one hand, it involves actual electronic hardware (not just coding, in fact there is no coding), which is kinda cool. On the other, it's Associate's degree level work, and while I normally wouldn't apply, my college tipped them off about me and thus I had to anyway (well, not "had to", but you know what I mean). They did send me some questions via email which I answered, and aside from a confirmation of receipt, that's all I've heard. I also applied for Subaru of Indiana Automotive, although all their hiring are assemblers (and that was because my father inlaw did the same tip-off routine).

So yes, people in my life do care, but it seems that I'm having to toss all or half my degree on the shelf to get any meaningful employment at all. Student loan payments are due, and savings won't get me far. I can apply for deferment but I don't want to get eaten alive by interest.

I'll be honest, I really wonder if I ****ed up by following my dreams and talents. I was one of the best in my class, the one who took the hardest projects and completed them the fastest and with the best quality. But I forgot that engineers need to be human, and as somebody whose had to deal with Asperger's all my life (I've gotten better, but I still have struggles), it seems I am not sufficiently human. This is also why I don't produce you tube videos; my voice is too high pitched, I naturally talk to fast, and I often find myself saying too much. Heck, I wonder if I post too much. At the same time, I've grown allergic to pity (a rough time in public school is mostly to blame) so I have a hard time accepting help as it feels like I'm not legitimately earning my way. I know I'm good, but nobody with hiring power agrees. I don't have the vision to start my own business; every product idea I have seems to have already been done by the Chinese for cheaper than I could match as a start-up.

So, it feels like I'm stuck in a ditch. I have skills I can't fully utilize, a degree that isn't paying off, and a wife whom I love so, so much that I can't provide for (and I feel so awful about that part). Graduation and Marriage (they were two weeks apart for me last May) are things that I though would be the gateway to a better life where I could start my career and (in time) family. Instead, things just seem to coast further and further downhill... It's not as low as my live has been before (2nd grade-7th grade were pretty bad, and high school had rough times as well) but that's really cold comfort at best.

At what point do I pronounce my career dead? And if I do, where do I go then?

I hate posting posts like this, but I feel I had something to say.
 

Online tggzzz

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Re: EET grad looking for work in North America
« Reply #24 on: February 16, 2016, 11:17:41 am »
Don't give up; it seems like you have strengths that are not visible in your CV. Hence modifying your CV might be beneficial.

To help you see it as others read it, I speed-read your CV as an HR-droid or engineer would. These points are overly blunt and hard-hitting simply to make the point. Here are my impressions, which are followed by the some tricks you might be able make your CV more interesting:
  • You did stuff and served your time. You didn't make a difference. (Example: " On two high school robotics teams:" So what? Big deal) From reading your postings, that isn't the case but there's nothing in your CV to indicate that! Show how/where you did more than necessary and achieved more than expected.
  • No "profile", so I don't know what you are nor what you want to be, nor where you might fit in my organisation
  • Vague adjectives, e.g. "Advanced Linux usage". Does that mean knows how to use "tar" or knows how to create device drivers?
  • Your understanding of a covering letter is wrong. It purpose is to briefly draw attention to why you are suitable for the job in question, so people will be sufficiently curious that they read your CV.
  • Your understanding of a CV is wrong - although you are following advice given by non-engineering droids. It should contain sufficient information that engineers feel that you might be able to help them with their problems, and want to interview you to find out if that's the case.

Do not underestimate the value of non-professional activities, provided you can show they are relevant or just curious/interesting. From my daughter's long obsolete CV:
  • At ... I was a volunteer ... initially responsible for... After completing ... I continued working there, becoming responsible for ... groups working safely with... (Shows early progression and responsibility)
  • ...I learned to ... at the minimum legal age of 16. As a member of the ... team, I was responsible for greeting visitors, completing legal ... paperwork, communicating safety information by radio and lights, ensuring the ... runs smoothly, retrieving aircraft. The club recognised my contribution by awarding me... (Shows dedication, trust/responsibility and formal recognition thereof, good starting point for a chat . Demonstrating responsible teamwork is surprisingly valuable.)
    While flying solo, an equipment failure significantly compromised the safety of the aircraft. In the official incident report... (I don't panic, a great talking point, and don't try to impress me with your mundane bullshit)
I'm sure you can find something in your background that demonstrates something you are proud of. (Your CV is full of assertions without demonstrable justification - whereas your posts hint at justifications)

I would suggest rewriting your CV, maybe in this format:
  • more than one page; overview and claimed broad competencies first, justifications later
  • profile of why you are the right person that will fit whatever they need now and in the future
  • team roles showing flexibility and progression
  • bullet point skills, for the robotic scanners
  • two lines per employment or other relevant period
  • bullet point project/technical list
  • detailed project/technial achievements, for selected projects that are relevant to the advert

Snippets from my CV where the ellipses indicate specific details...

Profile:
A flexible and adaptable professional engineer with significant experience in a wide range of technologies, applications and corporate roles across the full project life-cycle. His track record shows he can:... He is effective working independently or in small teams, and across geographic or corporate boundaries. He is particularly enthusiastic about working in any application domain involving:...

Corporate Roles and Technical Experience:
Roles: He flexibly adopts whichever role is necessary to ensure the team’s objectives are achieved: Engineer and Technical/Project Leader defining an implementing the full product and project life-cycle... Technical Consultant:...reviews...advising...assessing other companies’ products and processes... Miscellaneous: committees, sales....
Software: keywords for languages/environments/middleware/etc
Hardware: keywords, ditto
Application Domains, ditto

Career Outline:
Company N-3: Engineer and Project Leader in the Digital Systems Group, typically simultaneously operating in different roles in several very different projects

Education: two lines about degree, prizes, professional qualifications. Vital, but nobody really cares about this except that not having the right words can be a lock-out. HR-droids are looking for reasons to ignore CVs, and missing qualifications are an easy target.

Outline Achievements: one-line bullet points for everything I achieved
For details, including the impact on the companies and beyond, see the "Selected Achievements" section
conceiving and patenting a novel ...
conceiving, patenting, specifying and developing a...
developing and manufacturing a...
making key contributions to the FCC...
defining and implementing a...

Selected Achievements: one per project, only those relevant to the job advertised
Optical Attenuation Test Set
He designed and developed a test set that measured the attenuation of optical fibres. The test set was extremely accurate and had an optical dynamic range 20dB larger than the competitors (40dB electrical). This was due to a novel bandpass filter with a Q of ~4000 using 10% components. Two versions of the device were manufactured and produced. Technology: optical fibres, low-noise analogue electronics.


« Last Edit: February 16, 2016, 01:01:19 pm by tggzzz »
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
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