Author Topic: How to find guru that is willing to teach something using long distance approach  (Read 10184 times)

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Offline matrixofdynamismTopic starter

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Lets say a person wants to learn something very specific e.g using Xilinx ZYNQ to implement processor + FPGA design, design of PCB with DDR3 RAM and Intel MAX 10 FPGA, design of program that that uses Ethernet to communicate between PC and microcontroller or FPGA board e.t.c, we could try and use application notes and youtube videos e.t.c. but it might take a long time to learn something. Basically it will usually not be possible to find something tailored to our needs. When I say learn, I am talking about a basic design that utilizes that skill or technology and by implementing that basic design, a person learns how to do it so they can later use it to implement complex designs in their professional life or hobby project.

One way to deal with this is, as we use our evenings and weekends to learn about the subject, we chat with someone who knows the subject quite well and can answer questions directly or show the correct way to do something. Maybe this person can charge some amout of money on per hour basis.

How can an engineer find someone that is willing to teach them in this way by imparting what the guru has learned through our their professional life, while not working directly with that person in the same organization?
 

Offline tggzzz

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Lets say a person wants to learn something very specific e.g using Xilinx ZYNQ to implement processor + FPGA design, design of PCB with DDR3 RAM and Intel MAX 10 FPGA, design of program that that uses Ethernet to communicate between PC and microcontroller or FPGA board e.t.c, we could try and use application notes and youtube videos e.t.c. but it might take a long time to learn something. Basically it will usually not be possible to find something tailored to our needs. When I say learn, I am talking about a basic design that utilizes that skill or technology and by implementing that basic design, a person learns how to do it so they can later use it to implement complex designs in their professional life or hobby project.

One way to deal with this is, as we use our evenings and weekends to learn about the subject, we chat with someone who knows the subject quite well and can answer questions directly or show the correct way to do something. Maybe this person can charge some amout of money on per hour basis.

How can an engineer find someone that is willing to teach them in this way by imparting what the guru has learned through our their professional life, while not working directly with that person in the same organization?

Requirements such as those are very specific, require very detailed knowledge, and success/failure will depend on the details of implementation and on your pre-existing knowledge and aptitude.

I am unconvinced it would be practical to find someone willing to do that remotely and for free.

I suggest you focus your learning on either "design and programming" FPGAs, or on high speed memory and PCB design, or on a single toolchain such as Vivado for Zynq, or on embedded network programming. Trying to learn all of those simultaneously is biting off more than you can chew.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2023, 04:30:14 pm by tggzzz »
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
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Offline matrixofdynamismTopic starter

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I have already been working professionally with FPGAs with number of years and have completed few projects, going from specification to end product that is verified and proven to meet design requirements.
 

Offline tggzzz

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I have already been working professionally with FPGAs with number of years and have completed few projects, going from specification to end product that is verified and proven to meet design requirements.

Specifying what is not needed is at least as important as specifying what is needed.

I suggest you focus your learning on either "design and programming" FPGAs, or on high speed memory and PCB design, or on a single toolchain such as Vivado for Zynq, or on embedded network programming. Trying to learn all of those simultaneously is biting off more than you can chew.
There are lies, damned lies, statistics - and ADC/DAC specs.
Glider pilot's aphorism: "there is no substitute for span". Retort: "There is a substitute: skill+imagination. But you can buy span".
Having fun doing more, with less
 

Offline matrixofdynamismTopic starter

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Thanks, I do not need to learn these simultaneously. I just need to keep learning and expanding my knowledge, gradually.

I have used Altera/Intel, Xilinx and Microsemi tool chains for some years. This also means using the Qsys/Platform designer in Quartus and IP integrator in Xilinx and SmartDesign in Microsemi.
 

Online RoGeorge

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I have already been working professionally with FPGAs with number of years and have completed few projects, going from specification to end product that is verified and proven to meet design requirements.

If so, then you are "the guru".  There is no bigger scheme, and there is no savior to watch upon FPGA designers.  ;D

Take an IP, add it to your design, and learn from trial and error.  Eventually, post what you did, what didn't work, and with what errors.  Fastest route to learn would be to start from a known good example, or a demo board.

If it's for the job, ideally would be to have a contract for direct tech support with their engineers.  While Xilinx are top notch products, occasionally one might bump into some issue only their engineers can solve.  This is for rare corner cases, not for general learning.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2023, 01:05:53 pm by RoGeorge »
 
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Offline matrixofdynamismTopic starter

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I understand what you are saying, I have done exactly this for many years. However, I have grown tired of having to work out almost everything myself and when I ask questions on forum I get the response that there are too many questions or the answer is too long.

The approach of working out everything has worked well for some time. However, I have concluded that with someone that can merely provide a limited guidance (not hand holding) and can have a 1h chat per week, will go a long way. I would be willing to pay as well for it of course. But I don't know how to find someone.
 


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