Author Topic: Bonding Sillycone Rubber  (Read 896 times)

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Offline metrologist

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Bonding Sillycone Rubber
« on: October 16, 2018, 07:39:19 pm »
We had a slight mishap with our splat sow. It developed a small hole and started whizzing it's filtered water contents. I tried to repair the problem with what I thought was RTV sillycone, but it did not stick at all.

I never knew until now and after searching for glue that sticks to sillycone, and discovered this is probably some kind of sillycone rubber, and that RTV rubber means room temperature vulcanizing rubber. I came to this because I thought of trying some inner-tube repair kit with that vulcanizing glue.

Think that will work?
 

Offline TerraHertz

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Re: Bonding Sillycone Rubber
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2018, 05:21:14 am »
So that's what RTV means! I bought some 'RTV' recently, and still didn't know. I thought it was some silicone stuff.

However I don't understand anything else in your post. What is a 'splat sow'? The photo does the opposite of explaining this. And why does it contain filtered water especially, and why is it worth repairing a hole?

Is there some difference between sillycone and silicone, or are you just spelling it wrong for fun?
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Offline mzzj

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Re: Bonding Sillycone Rubber
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2018, 07:37:48 am »
This looks like kiddo's sticky "silicone" toys that are the latest craze for 5-year old kids.
Try thin superglue, worked somewhat ok with sticky octopus...
 

Offline metrologist

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Re: Bonding Sillycone Rubber
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2018, 08:02:49 am »
Yeah, an 'irreplaceable' gift from a trip to Italy. I found them at the party store down the street for $2. Maybe they can 'repair' themselves if you leave them in the dark for a couple days...but only once  :popcorn:

You can can have RTV silicone rubber too.

 

Offline Cyberdragon

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Re: Bonding Sillycone Rubber
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2018, 02:00:22 pm »
Did it squeal "what a world!"as it was melting there? >:D

You'll have to keep the water from leaking again while the glue dries somehow.
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Online Bud

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Re: Bonding Sillycone Rubber
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2018, 02:19:05 pm »
Try acrylic caulk for kitchen/bath, and if not worked, polyurethane construction sealant (wait a week to harden). Be discrete though as they may contain chemicals you do not want kids to be in contact with.
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Offline djQUAN

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Re: Bonding Sillycone Rubber
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2018, 02:36:48 pm »
I have had better results sticking CA glue (superglue) to silicone rubber vs silicone caulking/sealant. The hard dried CA glue would be an issue though. I read about soft flexible CA glue now but not sure of its availability.
 

Offline helius

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Re: Bonding Sillycone Rubber
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2018, 03:53:31 pm »
So that's what RTV means! I bought some 'RTV' recently, and still didn't know. I thought it was some silicone stuff.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silicone_rubber#Condensation_cure_system
Quote
Condensation curing systems can be one-part or two-part systems.[2] In one-part or RTV (room-temperature vulcanizing) system...

RTV silicones are one-part, condensation cure systems, that produce volatile byproducts during the curing process. The byproducts are either acetic acid (for acetoxy systems), methanol (for alkoxy systems), or methyl-ethyl-ketoxime (for oxime systems). The common tubes of silicone caulk are all RTV.

I tried to repair the problem with what I thought was RTV sillycone, but it did not stick at all.

Silicone caulk will not stick to dried silicone.

Quote
though the process may be affected by contact with some plastics or metals and may not take place at all if placed in contact with already-cured silicone compounds.
 


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