Author Topic: Pace TT-65 cleaning  (Read 2820 times)

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Offline RaxTopic starter

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Pace TT-65 cleaning
« on: April 21, 2024, 04:50:24 pm »
Hi all,
I have a TT-65 I got used and now I'm trying to use it for the first time with some brand new tips. On one leg, though, the tip doesn't insert very smoothly, and it's even harder to extract.

I am aware the inserting and removing is supposed to happen with the tip hot. I did get the specific brushes for the unit and I'm not sure using it helped yet.

I'm wondering though what others have done in similar situations. I could grab a round file and exert it a bit inside, but maybe that's not recommended.
 

Offline bdunham7

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2024, 06:05:21 pm »
Hi all,
I have a TT-65 I got used and now I'm trying to use it for the first time with some brand new tips. On one leg, though, the tip doesn't insert very smoothly, and it's even harder to extract.

I am aware the inserting and removing is supposed to happen with the tip hot. I did get the specific brushes for the unit and I'm not sure using it helped yet.

I'm wondering though what others have done in similar situations. I could grab a round file and exert it a bit inside, but maybe that's not recommended.

Are you doing it hot?  If the heating element is hot it will expand slightly, perhaps that's why they recommend it.  I wouldn't file them, but perhaps more brushing or some fine sandpaper rolled up might burnish the insides of the heater a bit.
A 3.5 digit 4.5 digit 5 digit 5.5 digit 6.5 digit 7.5 digit DMM is good enough for most people.
 

Offline RaxTopic starter

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2024, 09:06:24 pm »
It's been suggested I use high-temp anti-seize compound (such as copper-based).

I may call Pace on Monday to ask for advice, but I wonder if there is anything I should know before using anti-seize compound on this?
« Last Edit: April 22, 2024, 01:36:47 am by Rax »
 

Offline GLouie

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2024, 04:43:07 pm »
I have a TT-65 and just checking, my tips go in-out easily when cold. I seldom use it and only have one set of tips, so they usually stay in.

I assume the set screws are well backed out and both tips work the same in the problematic bore. Perhaps you have some damage to the bore such as a burr to the setscrew thread or even a slightly out of spec set of tips? My tip inserts measure 0.182 inches dia.

I have never had to clean out a Pace tip bore; desoldering path, yes. I'd be interested in what Pace says.
 

Offline Wallace Gasiewicz

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2024, 12:55:32 pm »
Some soldering manufacturers did recommend anti seize lubes in the past. I think Ungar recommended this. This was also recommended to me by a fellow who sells production soldering systems, There are two types of anti seize lube that I am aware of,  One is Copper based and One is Aluminum based,  I use the Aluminum based one and it has helped a lot with both soldering tips and solder sucker tips.  And also with the accumulation of crap in the solder sucker .  But I am using Old Equipment,  Pace and Edsyn stuff.   

The "Lube" is a suspension of metal particles in the liquid or paste "Vehicle" the petroleum Vehicle burns off when the tip is heated. Makes a lot of smoke.  The metal particles leave a smooth surface like a plating on the parts. Maybe more like a powder coat.   You just coat the part with this stuff and move it around in the iron before heating.

You can buy it at auto parts store.  You can also buy exhaust manifold gasket material that you can use to make those heat insulation parts that break and cost a bundle.
Edit: I used the Al product because it is close to the color of the soldering iron and also I think lead would stick to copper more so than stick to Al. But with more Al based solders I don't know which one would be best.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2024, 01:00:09 pm by Wallace Gasiewicz »
 

Offline tooki

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2024, 05:45:52 pm »
There are way more than 2 types. On one project I’m working on, the cartridge heater manufacturer suggests a specific paste (Varybond Regular Grade) which happens to contain graphite, copper, and aluminum powders. (As you can imagine, it’s got a gift for getting everywhere, just like thermal paste.)
 

Offline RaxTopic starter

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #6 on: May 01, 2024, 12:22:14 am »
Apologies y'all, still trying to carve out some time out of my day job and personal life to call Pace. I will post here as soon as I get some good info.
 

Offline bdunham7

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #7 on: May 01, 2024, 02:08:27 am »
There are way more than 2 types. On one project I’m working on, the cartridge heater manufacturer suggests a specific paste (Varybond Regular Grade) which happens to contain graphite, copper, and aluminum powders. (As you can imagine, it’s got a gift for getting everywhere, just like thermal paste.)

That's actually the most common type AFAIK.  The fairly standard auto-parts store Permatex is the combination blend and has a reasonbly low viscosity (for a paste) so you can apply thin coats.
A 3.5 digit 4.5 digit 5 digit 5.5 digit 6.5 digit 7.5 digit DMM is good enough for most people.
 
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Offline tooki

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2024, 07:39:44 pm »
That makes sense, about it being common: that would explain my pleasant surprise when I discovered the recommended paste was easy to get and very inexpensive.
 

Offline Shock

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #9 on: May 04, 2024, 01:02:04 pm »
You didn't say if you swapped the tips around or measured them with a caliper etc.  As mentioned above, it could possibly be a burr on the set screw hole (screw that fixes the tip in). In that case you might be able to knock the edge off. Take a look in the hole or on the outside of the tip for abrasion marks see if you can deduce where it's catching.

I suspect though the former owner may have been using just one side of the tweezer to prep boards or something and allowed oxidization to build up in the second heater. There is a cheap heater on ebay at the moment, check if you need one with a sensor first if you intend to replace it.

Just don't clean or try lubing it with anything that bakes on otherwise if it polymerizes it will be a complete headache.
Soldering/Rework: Pace ADS200, Pace MBT350
Multimeters: Fluke 189, 87V, 117, 112   >>> WANTED STUFF <<<
Oszilloskopen: Lecroy 9314, Phillips PM3065, Tektronix 2215a, 314
 

Offline RaxTopic starter

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #10 on: May 04, 2024, 01:39:35 pm »
I got to talking to Pace this week finally and - from memory, as I don't have my notes with me - but a few of the points they made are:
  • You can go pretty hard at the bore walls with some sandpaper, and even a round file. They are made of brass and should be pretty rugged; the risk of getting through and into the resistance chamber is pretty low. Just don't to anything crazy aggressive which may gouge the walls.
  • Measure the tip shanks to see whether the one not going in smoothly may be off spec.
  • Don't use any kind of compound or any anti-seize chemicals on the bore walls.

I haven't gotten a chance to go back to it yet, but will update here as soon as I do.

« Last Edit: May 04, 2024, 02:40:37 pm by Rax »
 
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Offline bdunham7

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #11 on: May 04, 2024, 01:46:27 pm »
If it's plain brass, then a straight reamer might be the way to go.

https://www.amazon.com/uxcell-Straight-Chucking-Cutting-Machine/dp/B07JPHBQKX?th=1
A 3.5 digit 4.5 digit 5 digit 5.5 digit 6.5 digit 7.5 digit DMM is good enough for most people.
 

Offline RaxTopic starter

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #12 on: May 04, 2024, 02:54:26 pm »
There is a cheap heater on ebay at the moment, check if you need one with a sensor first if you intend to replace it.

Away from home right now so I can't take a closer look and check, but I wonder if anyone's aware of a quick way to tell which type of heater my unit uses.
 

Offline bdunham7

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #13 on: May 04, 2024, 03:06:48 pm »
On each handpiece there is one heater with a sensor and one without.  I'm not sure if buying a "cheap" heater is the way to go since I've been seeing complete new TT-65 Sensatemp handpieces for $100 or less.  Also, I'm a bit confused over which heaters fit Sensatemp and which work with Intelliheat.  I'm only seeing one set of part numbers, 6010-0082-P1 (w/ sensor) and 6010-0083-P1 (w/o sensor).  I don't see how they could work with both Sensatemp and Intelliheat since they use different sensors but perhaps there's some detail in those systems that I don't know about.

Edit:  OK, Intelliheat works with two different systems, only the connector is different between the two versions when using older Sensatemp-type handpieces.  The heaters should be the same for either version. I think I actually knew that but just didn't make the connection to the heater setup.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2024, 04:54:43 pm by bdunham7 »
A 3.5 digit 4.5 digit 5 digit 5.5 digit 6.5 digit 7.5 digit DMM is good enough for most people.
 

Offline Shock

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #14 on: May 05, 2024, 12:04:24 pm »
Using a tool is an overkill, a tight fit can just mean it needs cleaning or a mild sanding (if it's determined the socket is undersized).
Soldering/Rework: Pace ADS200, Pace MBT350
Multimeters: Fluke 189, 87V, 117, 112   >>> WANTED STUFF <<<
Oszilloskopen: Lecroy 9314, Phillips PM3065, Tektronix 2215a, 314
 

Offline RaxTopic starter

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Re: Pace TT-65 cleaning
« Reply #15 on: May 19, 2024, 12:54:03 am »
I went in there with a round file - actually, two, but the fine toothed one didn't do zip - and dug in there a bit and I think it's fine now. There was definitely some crud on one of the shafts.

I think it's all good now, but I'll actually use it tonight and will report back here if anything worth updating.
 
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