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EEVblog #1035 – Flaming DIY Power Supply

Smoke in the EEVblog Lab! What component failed and caught alight in the RD Tech ...

  • Roberto Arano

    Any reason they would not use non contact x-y hall effect sense i.c’s with a magnet on the bottom of the joystick, rather than wiper-tracks? The ones I have work well for joystick applications.

    • You can chose either in this case, presumably wiper for environments that fear magnetic interference?

      • Roberto Arano

        Cool ,or maybe a redundant cross check for max. reliability/safety , like drive by wire throttle does …except they use TWIN POTS on the pedal AND the throttle blade.

  • John Senchak

    Wun Hung Lo , Money shot, stiff joystick , = Joystick porn

    • No doubt I’ve pissed off a great many that all that!

      • John Senchak

        We need a tear down of that russian computer porn next

  • PrairieSteve

    another great teardown! I deal with joysticks of this grade, and it looks pretty good. The use of resistive pots for the X & Y axes was surprising, but might be appropriate if the equipment doesn’t expect to see more than a million cycles. The resistive ink in good pots can be very rugged, and the use of wipers with multiple fingers is something I’ve seen before in very rugged potentiometer applications. The use of a 4-20mA communication protocol does suggest that it is intended for a more basic application without a lot of sophistication.
    The second joystick did appear to use hall sensors for the X & Y axes. These have become quite common in the good joysticks and offer a huge improvement in reliability and fault tolerance. Another feature is that many offer calibration in the hall device itself which can allow unique non-linear functions. Very useful! Most will allow serial communication with the uC too, which avoids some of the analog failure modes that can occur with potentiometers or analog hall devices. Analog failures tend to be undetectable by the micro, and can lead to uncommanded movement of the device being controlled by the joystick,

    • Yes, there is the option for either hall effect movement sensing or resistive wiper.

  • Neutron

    Penny and Giles – I think Giles is pronounced “Jiles” (like “Farmer Giles”).
    At least it was in UK broadcast engineering when we used such things as their high quality linear motorised faders.
    (See e.g. http://www.pennyandgiles.com/Products/Audio-Faders-Video-Controllers.aspx)

  • Travis Swaim

    Thanks for the tear down. I have one a friend gave me a similar one that came off of an electric forklift. I found out it uses the CAN bus protocol. I thought about making a project around it, but haven’t decided to mess with CAN bus or just gut the electronics and use the switches and sensors.

  • tlhIngan

    Couple of points.

    1) Flight sims require that the gimbals do not have a X-Y preferential action – you must be able to do pitch and roll simultaneously which does require off axis use. This is a problem with the Thrustmaster HOTAS Cougar joystick (a $500 flight stick) and many mods were made to counteract the differential feel between on and off axis use. (There are also many premium flight sticks out there that probably cost a fair bit as well).

    2) The output is not 4-20mA x 2 – it’s saying the X2 output (X axis output #2) is 4-20mA. If you look, there’s another one labelled 4-20mAY2. Presumably there’s also an X1 and Y1 output.

  • Great teardown. Great tutorial video.

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